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Port Hurons Are Perky!

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Here are 2 more:

Dick Neeley's 19 Port Huron with the cab and Ray Alber's 16 Port Huron.

Dick & Ray have passed on and both engines have been sold.

I believe the 16 Port Huron in Brad's post is Dick's 16. If so, the engine now belongs to Buddy Hale down in Virginia.

Beth
 

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G Willikers

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
05/01/2019
Gee and Beth:

Port Huron's are poetry in motion,..............................cause they're,.........................LongFellows:D :D .

Robert
Oh! You are such a card Robbie me lad:)
Here are a couple more 1907 "Thresherman" pix. A 32 pulling 10 Cockshutt plows and then a testimonial. Not sure if the testimonial goes with the engine pictured? The engine is a single??? What gives Beth?
G.
 

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Sawyer-Massey 11-22

Registered
Age
64
Gee:

You are too kind, no really. I was hoping Beth would catch that one before you did. Goes to show, you just can't pull the wool over an old Canuck's eyes. Least you did not call me a cad.

Keep the P H post coming, wouldn't mind having one of them in the garage myself:cool: .

Robert
 

HarryFrye

Registered
Harry,

How about a photo of your brother Dean's 19 Port Huron at Wauseon?

...and, just couldn't resist posting a picture of your 16 Baker while it was at Wauseon too!:wave:

Beth
Oh Beth,

I just have to respond to this request. Here is a photo of both my brother's Dean's PH and my Baker at Wauseon in 1994 while I was still in Thailand. Nice pic of my brother's Port with Gerry Lee, Dean and Dean Jr on it, and I especially appreciate the pic of my Baker with my Dad, brother and Dean Jr. You really know how to pull at the heart strings Beth.

Thanks again

Harry
 

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Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Hi Harry,

I knew you would appreciate that picture! Mother Nature really rained on us that year & we had a heck of a time loading them.

G & Robert, I've been away from the computer....I noticed the comment, but not before you read them!:D

G, that is a single Port Huron--which were the forerunners to the tandem compounds. When I get home, I will verify the size, I'm thinking 30 hp.

Beth:wave:
 

G B Lee

Registered
Last Subscription Date
09/29/2012
Beth,
Harry,

What a pleasant surprise to see Dean's PH posted on this site. Harold, Dean, Dean Jr., and Harry adopted my son, Jeff and myself to be part of their steam experience at the NTA back in the early 1980's. Learned alot about steam from Dean and his father. His PH was the first engine I ran. Would be nice if the PH could be at the NTA in 2007 as it will be the featured make of traction engine.

Thanks sharing the picture.


Regards......Gerry Lee
 

Ask The User

Email NOT Working
Oh! You are such a card Robbie me lad:)
Here are a couple more 1907 "Thresherman" pix. A 32 pulling 10 Cockshutt plows and then a testimonial. Not sure if the testimonial goes with the engine pictured? The engine is a single??? What gives Beth?
G.
This engine appears to be a 26 horse simple engine, same boiler. Great picture. All great pictures. In my opinion it's hard to find a better looking engine than a Port Huron. I may be a bit biased though.

Beth,

I would post some pictures of the 32 excavation at Rynda's but I didn't have a chance to take any other than before and after. I still haven't had a chance to get the photos Roland took while we were digging (literally) it out. I would love to have copies of those. Reanne mentioned to me that she has copies for me. I'm looking forward to having the head tank on at Wauseon next year when we feature Port Huron. Kemler is getting a new wrapper rolled for me. I have some pictures of it on the engine over at Daren's when we were working on it. I couldn't believe it at the auction when Roland told me that it was up by the barn. Now if I could just locate a pair of extension rims.:shrug:
 

Ray Wangler

Registered
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2013
I know nothing of Ports. Side mounted, wet bottom? How about straw burners? Were those cast drivers good? Was the 32 the biggest? What was the smallest, and how many of the different sizes were made? Did they make separators, hullers, sawmills etc…..? How about gas tractors? C’mon you Port-Huron fans, get to braggin’ It’d also be nice for us uninformed to hear the problems with Port steamers. Were they built with thick boilers or relatively thin? What lead to the demise.

Very interesting so far

Thanks
Ray
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Ray,

I think we can handle your challenge. Port Hurons are wet bottom boilers. They are a side mounted engine with an exception of the doubles. The early engines were singles while the later ones are tandem compounds. They did make a 19, 22, & 30 hp double tandem compound.

I've attached how the tandem compound works from the catalog.

BTW, most Port Huron owners would rather you experience the Port Huron. The engine speaks for itself.

Phil, I'll see if I can get those pictures. Mine were pretty dark since the daylight was waning when we helped you pull it out.

Beth
 

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Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
I snapped these photos of this PORT HURON # 7621 at WMSTR on September 1, 2006. The only information I have is from a 1982 WMSTR showbook:

This 24-75 PORT HURON steam engine which was built in 1915 in Michigan where it spent its first 60 years. The engine is owned by The Hawley Herald.


According to my PORT HURON catalog:
HORSE POWER - Brake Rating 75, Nominal Rating 24.
CYLINDERS - Diameters 7 1/2" and 11"; Stroke 10"; Balanced Valve.
SPEED - 250 rpm.
FLY WHEEL - Diameter 40", Face 11 1/2"; Weight 650 lbs.
FRONT WHEELS - Diameter 44", Face 12"; Tracks with ordinary wagon.
DRIVE WHEELS - Diameter 71", Face 20"; Self-Cleaning.
STEAM PRESSURE - 175 lbs.
SHIPPING WEIGHT - Regular Domestic 20,700 lbs.


Maybe when Beth visits Rollag she'll operate this engine?


Gary K

(NOTE: Been experimenting with photos . . . these are 700 pixel width, and had been jpeg for the second time through PAINT to reduce KB's)
 

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HarryFrye

Registered
Had to post one more picture. Since I posted a 1994 picture of my Baker and my Brother's Port together at Wauseon, and an earlier picture of my Granddad's Port in Ypsilanti, thought I would post the following of my Baker with my Granddad's Port taken, I guess, in the late 30s. Maybe someone can ID the year of the car, but I think the pic is around 38 or 39. Sorry but this is the best I could do as far as enhancement goes.

Harry
 

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Ask The User

Email NOT Working
I know nothing of Ports. Side mounted, wet bottom? How about straw burners? Were those cast drivers good? Was the 32 the biggest? What was the smallest, and how many of the different sizes were made? Did they make separators, hullers, sawmills etc…..? How about gas tractors? C’mon you Port-Huron fans, get to braggin’ It’d also be nice for us uninformed to hear the problems with Port steamers. Were they built with thick boilers or relatively thin? What lead to the demise.

Very interesting so far

Thanks
Ray
Ray,

As far as I know, the largest engine Port Huron built was the 38 hp. double tandem compound. Very few of those were built. With regard to the number of sizes, many. I'm not sure about the smallest but at least 12 hp and almost every number in between, up to 32 hp. I don't know of any in between 32 and 38.

Port Huron made a complete line of agricultural and construction equipment, including (but not limited to) threshers, shredders, sawmills, plows, road building equipment, etc.

They built simple and compound engines, which they are noted for producing the most successful compound engine. They were a fairly large company, which included a boiler shop(built good, high quality boilers) and a foundry(prided themselves on exceptional castings). Starting in 1900 the drive wheels were predominantly cast, self-cleaning wheels though some rolled drivers were produced. The Port Huron cast drivers are probably the most recognizable traction engine wheel ever produced. I can speak from experience that you never need to clean the mud off a Port Huron drive wheel. We've tested that advertising claim many times at Wauseon and proven it to be fact. They truly are self-cleaning wheels.

Overall, they built around 6,500 engines. They did produce one size of gas tractor, though it's success was limited. It used a Chief engine. I'm not sure exactly what year it went into production, I believe somewhere around 1917. I'll look through some catalogs if you want more information on the tractor. As for the company's demise, I believe it's attributable to it's inability to transition into the tractor market. They built engines into the mid-20's. They are an easy firing, easy to handle engine, with good power. The longfellow boilers(9 ft. tubes) also demonstrate exceptional economy. I hope I didn't sound too partial.
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
I snapped these photos of this PORT HURON # 7621 at WMSTR on September 1, 2006.

Maybe when Beth visits Rollag she'll operate this engine?

Gary K


Hi Gary!:wave:
Sure, I'd be game to take the old girl for a spin or workout!

I see that it has a lapseam boiler. By any chance can someone check the back head of the boiler & see if it has the ASME stamp?

What pressure is it inspected for? ...100 psi? I see it has the short canopy and the 26 in contractor drivers.

As a 1916, it would have been built during the transition time. I'd be curious (and I'm sure Bruce would be also) to see what stamps are on the back head.

Thanks!

Beth
 
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Ray Wangler

Registered
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2013
All, you’ve significantly bragged up your favorite engine……good job!!! I learned much from the discussion. The compounding I knew, the wheels and implement line, I had no idea. PH’s are nicely balanced as far as aesthetics and the later STC’s are truly recognizable by the engines and drivers. 6500 engines is a respectably sized company. Can anyone answer what happened to the company?
 

Sawyer-Massey 11-22

Registered
Age
64
Ray: If you have a copy of Wendel's American Farm tractors, I believe the P H tractor is listed in there as well as a pic or two.

On that note, are there any P H tractors known to exist? I know this is the wrong forum to ask this, but wht the heck.

Robert
 

Gustp

Registered
The poor old Port, as it's called at Rollag, is out of service. Some crown sheet problems. She's been allowed 117 lbs for the last number of years. It's been a fun engine to run and is really nice to give newcomers lever time. Got it screened off to keep the critters out. See what happens--maybe there's some sugar daddy out there. Hate to see any engine as a static display. Like I tell the steam school students When an engine is turning over reeaall slow and you crack the door open you can hear it breathing.
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
I'm sorry to hear that the Port is out of service--for now. I noticed the critter doors.

I've said it many times.......my Port Huron has a heartbeat when she runs. More people need to experience that!:D

Beth
 
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