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Preserving Polished Brass?

Farmall_Doctor

Registered
Is there a good way to preserve brass that you have spent hours polishing? I go through many different cleaning and polishing mediums before getting to the final product, with the final treatment being Brasso. Does this product have decent preservation qualities? What about coating with an automotive wax? Does anything at all work, or do you just re-polish whenever you have the time? Thanks for any input.
 

Tom Runty

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I had an unlacquered bugle in my youth, and would get it all shined up with brasso. After a week it looked like I had done nothing. So, no, brasso does a good job but does not hold the shine. I have used spray clear coat on brass parts, but it darkens with the heat. Would be interested if someone has found success with this.
 

DustyBar

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/14/2020
Flitz has worked well for me. I'm amazed how long it keeps the shine, of course its environment would have some affect too.
 

Butch KG1775

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Eastwood has a product called Exo-Armour we have been using it on whistles seems to hold up well its a little pricey $65.00 its a two part mix but goes a long way.
 

grub54891

Registered
Age
63
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
I've played around with the idea of thinning some varnish, and dipping. Haven't tried it yet though. Some brass comes with a micro coating on it already, but when it gets chipped off them areas get tarnished. One of these days I'll try it,
 

Steve Kunz

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I have not had any luck keeping it shiny. I would definitely not use any kind of clear coat or varnish. It will still darken eventually and then it is a real pain to try to get that off. I have not tried the Eastwood stuff, does it get hard like a clear coat?
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Musical instruments keep the brass shinny for a life time and longer. They use a special lacquer for that purpose. I don't want to buy a gallon. I haven't found it in spray cans. I use Helmsman spar urethane clear gloss. I have coated things 10 , 20 , 30 years ago and they are still good as new. Polish , clean , degrease. Ron
 

Turbo

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
I have had very good luck with Rustoeum Automotive spray lacquer. I have been using it for at least 5 years on magnetos and oilers that I clean up. I have a 6 HP Fairbanks H engine with a Sumpter magneto that I coated with this 3 years ago. It lives in a shed in Minnesota with wild temp swings and high humidity. It still looks like it did when I sprayed it. So far on everything I have coated I see no yellowing either.
 

Butch KG1775

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
I have not had any luck keeping it shiny. I would definitely not use any kind of clear coat or varnish. It will still darken eventually and then it is a real pain to try to get that off. I have not tried the Eastwood stuff, does it get hard like a clear coat?
the eastwood stuff gets hard 2+2 carb cleaner takes it off and then the shine can be recoated sometimes with only wiping it off with a rag
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Musical instruments keep the brass shinny for a life time and longer. They use a special lacquer for that purpose. I don't want to buy a gallon. I haven't found it in spray cans. I use Helmsman spar urethane clear gloss. I have coated things 10 , 20 , 30 years ago and they are still good as new. Polish , clean , degrease. Ron
After seeing the video I see that he used # 2105 lacquer. (a special lacquer , not automotive lacquer) I did a search and found the #2105 musical instrument lacquer in spray cans. It is a little more expensive. That is what I will be getting. Ron
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/17/2020

Andrew Webb

Registered
Hey Darryn.... I think one of the problems with polish is that many don’t remove the product after the metal is shined....

I personally found after comparison, that Peak polish (found at crappy tire) is the best.... but after the metal is shined, you need to take a damp microfibre cloth and make sure the polishing product is removed. When the product is exposed to further moisture, it speeds up the tarnishing process from what I have noticed.
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
To Butch and Glenn , I don't know what kind things you are working on , But the stuff I am working on is model gas and steam engines. I polish the brass and bright metal then coat it with Helmsman spar urethane. I don't want to have to clean and polish every few years. I want my restoration to last a lifetime. Here are two that I have worked on , one 10 years ago and one 20 years ago. Ron
 

Attachments

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/17/2020
There are no words to describe how awesome your work is Ron !!!

I think I would still trust this Sharkhide on it. You just rub it on with your finger or a soft cloth.
I did a 6" steam whistle ... probably over 3 years ago ... & it sits in my un-heated .. un-insulated, tin generator shanty .. & it still looks like the day I did it. I've taken it off of it's board / stand , several times & hauled it to work & plumbed it up to a Tow-Behind Ingersol compressor ... guys have handled it & pawed over it ... then it goes back on the board.
If you have something that works for you ... on your indoor museum quality stuff , then by all means, keep using it.
The guy asked about protecting his polished brass & the Sharkhide is the best I ever found. I really liked the idea that if a spot starts "Turning" ... you just polish it back out & re-coat the whole thing without stripping off poly or varnish or shellac.
.
 
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garybarber

Guest
I am an old man now (67 next month) and many years ago an older gentleman said that "the light" would take it's toll on polished brass so any brass that he polished to a very bright shine was kept in the dark when not being displayed Just thought I would pass that along before I took it with me
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
I am an old man now (67 next month) and many years ago an older gentleman said that "the light" would take it's toll on polished brass so any brass that he polished to a very bright shine was kept in the dark when not being displayed Just thought I would pass that along before I took it with me
Actually its whats in the air (oxygen) that causes polished brass to tarnish. But, I guess if you kept polished brass in a closed cabinet that limits it access to air that would help.
 

georgineer

Registered
Actually its whats in the air (oxygen) that causes polished brass to tarnish. But, I guess if you kept polished brass in a closed cabinet that limits it access to air that would help.
That sounds a lot more convincing.

And Gary - old at 67? I'm more than that, but my inner man is still 30.

George B.
 
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