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Reeves are Sweet!

Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

My nephew Randy Yaeger became a real SmokStak-er today (Over in Colin's "Case numbers for Chuck" thread.), leaving the ranks of the lurkers forever! I thought I should post a photo here of the circa 1908-09 20hp Reeves double simple #5187 owned by my son Mike and Randy (R). The engine lives on Mike's place west of Helena, Montana which is their city of residence. They purchased the engine from Carl Mehmke who had the engine on loan to a museum in eastern Montana. Welcome aboard Randy!:cool:
Uncle Gary;)

 
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Reeves1665

Registered
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Here is another pic of 1665 at Rough and Tumble in August this year. After running this for the season, I must say it is one the best engines I have ever operated. With 186 square feet heating surface in the little gal, it even fires easy on simple and will keep steam up when pulling hard; just have the all the water you can available!!

Josh
 

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Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Josh,

....and WHO guessed correctly how many square feet it had, when you were caught off guard?!:D

It has a place waiting for it here.......you just may not get it back!:brows:
Beth
 

BDMelon

Registered
Age
56
Last Subscription Date
12/29/2008
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

:D I took these pictures of this Reeves at show in Ny, it was a great looking
piece of iron, :uhoh: i hope the people that own it , don't get upset i posted their Reeves, but it needs to be seen i think!!!!! don't you?:shrug:

Brian :wave:
 

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G Willikers

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
05/01/2019
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

BDMelon - Thanx for the above pix - very nice. Brian Harris has done up a number of engines with new boilers that he made himself. He went through the process of getting all the necessary stamps and authorizations to make welded boilers so he could do a few up - as I recall he also has a 20hp (?) Sawyer-Massey, Minnie and more? Fine gent. I guess he is done with boiler making for now?
G.
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

BDMelon,
Thank you for those pictures! There were some posted elesewhere on the Stak, so you shouldn't be in trouble, only commended. I noticed they call it a 60, which Emerson & Brantingham did to the Reeves engines later in their production. I guess E&B was trying to "Casify" their engines, as JI did that in 1910 on all and some before that. Maybe it was a "case" of trying to sing off of the same page? Thanks again for posting the photos.
Gary;)
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

G Willikers,
This first picture is of the late Earl Tyler of Moore, Montana, powering a gravel crusher in Judith Basin County, when the new McAdam road was built between Hobson and Lewistown in the mid-1930s. The engine is 32 Reeves cc US #7888, likely a 1915 engine. Earl was paid $5.00 per day... With the engine! Earl bought the engine from the Arro Refinery at Lewistown for $20; but when I went through the "gee whiz" gyrations said, "Yeah, well I had to work a bunch of weekends for that $20!"



This is a picture of Mike Tyler and myself taken in 1991 with Reeves cc #7888, when we had it fired up for Max Tyler's birthday in July of that year. Steam wise, Mike Tyler and me go back to the first time I tossed a match into a firebox "for real." The plates inside the boiler bottom of this engine are as smooth as a baby's hiney.



This is a front view photo of 32hp Reeves cc #7888 taken by Max Tyler in 1938.



This side view of Reeves #7888 was taken by Max Tyler in 1938 and shows Max's brother Earl and their dad, Charlie on the engine. This was the last year they plowed with this engine, pulling their Emerson disk plows. In 1939, it was too wet for the big engines and I know of four 32hp Reeves engines that were "retired" in that neighborhood that year, for that reason.
Gary

 
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Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Gary, thanks for the prices, they are closer than I thought. Wouldn’t you love to sit in a board or production meeting in Columbus in 1907 and listen to the logic for the decisions that were made? Thanks again!

Ray
Ray,
You may ask these gentlemen the next time they meet if you could sit in on the meeting?
Gary;)

 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Here is some farming being done by Len Chapin's outfit in the Pownell, Montana area of the Judith Basin. Left to right are: a 30-60 Pioneer gas, Big Four gas, Z-? Peerless, 40-120 Reeves and 40-65 Reeves gas. Melvin, the 40 Reeves steamer is in front of Square Butte and it is my favorite mountain in Montana. When I lived in the Judith Basin, I loved looking at that flat topped hill.



Not too many miles away from Pownell was this picture of Frank Strouf's 40-120 hauling wagon loads of sacked grain from Wolf Creek to Stanford.
Gary;)

 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

This is a 32 Reeves cross compound and Reeves steam lift plow, circa 1907, taken in a Russian community in northeastern Montana. I love the two caps to the rear, and wish I had one just like them! I'd have to admit they are more authentic than my polka dot or any of the striped choo choo caps.
Gary;)
 

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Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

This is a 32 Reeves cross compound and Reeves steam lift plow, circa 1907, taken in a Russian community in northeastern Montana. I love the two caps to the rear, and wish I had one just like them! I'd have to admit they are more authentic than my polka dot or any of the striped choo choo caps.
Gary;)

20 Reeves Highwheeler:
I noticed the rear water tank is lengthwise, and not crosswise . . . is there a reason for this? I've seen pictures of other 32's having the tank lengthwise . . . is that something the manufacturer did upon request?

Gary K
 

Ray Wangler

Registered
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Gary, thanks for the confidence I'll end up in the same place as those fellows!!! Grandma is there now, putting in the words it'll take to make it happen. Let's hope there's a bit of a time lapse between now and then to finish the little 32.......::wave:

Ray
 

Beth V

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
03/03/2018
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Not too many miles away from Pownell was this picture of Frank Strouf's 40-120 hauling wagon loads of sacked grain from Wolf Creek to Stanford.
Gary;)

Gary,

Excellent example of an early "set back front end" & pulling multiples! That front end should have made the 40 easy (ier?) to get around with. I wonder how well those wagons followed the leader?:brows: The high cab would be a must to pull such a long load.

Did all of the 40's have the front end set back so far? I haven't seen the correct angle on Smolik's to know.

Thanks for excellent pictures!

Beth
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

20 Reeves Highwheeler:
I noticed the rear water tank is lengthwise, and not crosswise . . . is there a reason for this? I've seen pictures of other 32's having the tank lengthwise . . . is that something the manufacturer did upon request?

Gary K
Gary K,
I don't know how this is all going to look until I "Submit Reply" but I am uploading an ad of my son Mike's (WHICH IS THE THUMBNAIL AT THE BOTTOM), showing a 32 cc Reeves that had to have obviously been built and photographed in 1904, the first year of the 32hp size. It is on the American Thresherman cover of the February 1905 edition. This engine is pulling some horse pulled plows, as Reeves hadn't yet developed their own plows. Reeves developed their 32 as their first double geared engine. After developing the engine, likely moreso for road construction, discovered they'd actually built one darn fine plowing engine and the farm homesteads were being settled (and broken) as fast as flies gathering at a picnic in that time period. It appears that in about 1905 -06, Harry Clay was building his new Reeves steam lift plows. As Mike's advertizement shows, you could get the platform mounted water tanks on their 32hp cc traction engines from the get go, and the "sample" 32 in the catalog also shows them. However, the advent of the steam lift plow brought about the short plow mounted water tank for engines that didn't have the rear mounted tank. This plow mounted tank was apparently the same water tank Reeves had been using regularly on their Monarch Tender.

My first gallery photo shows an Advance pulling a Reeves plow, courtesy of my good friend Melvin Pierce. It has the short "Monarch" tank mounted and this side view show you the length. This is the only photo I have ever seen of a steam lift plow with steam being exhausted out of the plow's lift cylinders.



The second photo from my gallery shows none other than Harry Clay himself on the plow, in the derby and likely photographed in Kansas. This shows that early on in Reeves plow sales, this plow mounted water tank/coal bunker was a popular option. Later engines pulling the Reeves steam lift plows appear to be more frequent with the rear water tank/bunker mounted on the engine platform. My guess for that was the engine mounted tank and coal bunker was much handier for firing, especially with the coal chute that would allow a pile of coal to be deposited on the fireman's platform. The view of the plows was better with the plow mounted tank, but the coal was handier with the engine platform mounted tank and bunker and the tank held more water too.

 

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Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Gary, thanks for the confidence I'll end up in the same place as those fellows!!! Grandma is there now, putting in the words it'll take to make it happen. Let's hope there's a bit of a time lapse between now and then to finish the little 32.......::wave:

Ray
Ray,
I'm trying to stave off this "board of directors" event a few more years myself!
Gary;)
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Gary,

Excellent example of an early "set back front end" & pulling multiples! That front end should have made the 40 easy (ier?) to get around with. I wonder how well those wagons followed the leader? The high cab would be a must to pull such a long load.

Did all of the 40's have the front end set back so far? I haven't seen the correct angle on Smolik's to know.

Thanks for excellent pictures!

Beth
Beth,
I am posting another photo of Len Chapin's engine near Pownell, with a Reeves steam lift plow and showing the king post in what appears to be the same location. Len's and the earlier of Frank Strouf's wagon train are both 40-120hp US engines. You are correct about being high in that cab. I don't think these wagons follow as nicely as the steel wheel articulating type like I was pulling and posted over in the N&S thread yesterday.



This second photo is of Frank Strouf's 40-140 hpCanadian Special engine pulling a 36' cut combined harvester in his grainfield. The king post appears to be back quite a ways there too?



I don't have any side views of Smolik's 40-140hp with the front axle at a right angle with the boiler barrel. This one has the axle in a left turn mode which plays tricks on my eyes. Maybe you can judge for us? Don't ask who that old engineer is beside it. He's kind of cranky today!
Gary;)

 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

G Willikers,
You are my interpereter... What did Farquhar say? I've seen it on something else, but I attended a one room school house. Latin and Greek are Greek to me.:rolleyes:
Gary;)
PS: Farquhar... Wasn't that on Grandma's "grandmother's clock" somewhere?
 
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Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

20 Reeves Highwheeler:
Thanks for posting those old photos with an explanation pertaining to the bunker and water tank. Riew view . . . the "Monarch" tank tender looked like the water tank was mounted crosswise on the engine!

Gary K
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Re: Reeves Are Sweet!

Gary K,
I knew that was what you were likely thinking and that is the reason I posted the photo of the plow mounted tank behind the Advance!
Gary Y;)
 
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