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Removing Upright Carb Air Valve Cap on Carb?

enginesilo

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Last Subscription Date
07/24/2014
I've started to tinker with one of my uprights with a common E carb. I tried to remove the air valve cap on top of the carburetor but don't want to risk stripping it. I started to turn and can see the soft metal wanting to strip so I stopped. On my other carb I can easily remove it but this one seems tight.

Any recommendations on how to get this off? Socket? Locking pliers? All tips appreciated.

The valve cap I am mentioning is this one seen here.
 

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Mark Shulaw

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Last Subscription Date
01/27/2013
No special tools needed. Remove the carb from the engine. Look your hammers over for one with a flat striking face. Many have a rounded face some severe like ball peen hammers. Use the one with the flattest face, While holding the carb in hand strike the top of the air valve cap with the hammer as hard as you can manage several times. Avoid hitting the edges if you can, it will make your life easier. Then use an adjustable or end wrench whichever works best. It should come loose easily. Hitting it jars the corrosion bond loose thus the nut comes loose more easily. If you get one of these that the flats are all destroyed and you can not get a wrench on it clean the top till its brite and shiney and tin the top with solder. Then solder a nut or any piece of metal that you can get on it that a wrench will fit. You can also use a dremmel tool to cut a grove in the center of the cap that a screwdriver can fit. Notice these are all whats referred to as primitive Pete methods aimed towards the not to well equipped shop, Like mine grinnn... Your results may vary, I am well schooled in Primitive Pete. Mark
 

enginesilo

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Last Subscription Date
07/24/2014
No special tools needed. Remove the carb from the engine. Look your hammers over for one with a flat striking face. Your results may vary, I am well schooled in Primitive Pete. Mark
Awesome recommendations Mark! Thank you!

Once inside should I inspect the spring to make sure it has bounce, and then give it a spray of cleaner to make sure there is no gunk inside? I already pulled off the small piece on the end where the gas gets sucked in and dislodged the small ball inside so now it shakes.
 

Mark Shulaw

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Last Subscription Date
01/27/2013
Awesome recommendations Mark! Thank you!

Once inside should I inspect the spring to make sure it has bounce, and then give it a spray of cleaner to make sure there is no gunk inside? I already pulled off the small piece on the end where the gas gets sucked in and dislodged the small ball inside so now it shakes.
Actually I say totally dismantle it to clean it thoroughly. Watch the little plug on top, when you remove it theres a wee check ball supposed to be under it, i think you mentioined it but you might have been talking about the check assembly too just want to be certain. Very seldome have I seen that air valve spring in a good condition. Mostly they are all worn distorted or modified. And a good share of the time the air valve and seat have moderate to extreme wear. Many times the spring is stretched to compensate for the wear of the valve and seat.
TTYL, Mark
 

Tom S

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Age
50
Last Subscription Date
09/08/2019
Tapping normally works, and generally helps loosen 92 style carbs too. If they still don't come reach for your hand held propane torch. A good heating along with the tapping will geter' loose for sure. :)
 

enginesilo

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Last Subscription Date
07/24/2014
Thanks Mark and Tom!
I'm going to try these methods out soon when I have the time.
 

enginesilo

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Last Subscription Date
07/24/2014
Thanks again for the tips guys. A few hits with a brass hammer, and a some minor torch action and it twisted off. Carb was much cleaner inside than I thought it would be.

Another question, I removed the nut on the outer side holding the jet in place but the jet wouldn't come out, so I'm guessing that the threaded end is screwed into the carb body. Should I just grab my pliers and twist that double sided threaded piece out and then the jet will come right out?
 

Mark Shulaw

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Last Subscription Date
01/27/2013
Yes there is a piece needs to be threaded out of the body. Called the packing gland. This blocks the nozzle or jet from backing all the way out. If the nozzle shaft is buggered up in any way it will hinder the removal of the packing gland so you either have to clean up the shaft or back the nozzle out with the packing gland. The nut (packing gland nut) does not actually hold the jet in place its there to jam packing material around the shaft to seal it from air leaks. Around that nozzle shaft or jet is the one critical place to seal leaks as much as possible. Mark
 
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enginesilo

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Last Subscription Date
07/24/2014
Hi Mark,
Thanks for those specifics. I figured it was threaded on the backend when the needle stopped coming out after a certain point. I am going to see if I can get the packing nut out when I get some time. It looks like its connected to the carb body really good, but i'm hoping its just dirt crud and it unscrews without too much trouble or damage. I'll keep you posted and thanks again for the info!
 
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