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"Rolling" a bandsaw blade?

Pete Spaco

Registered
An Amish guy was telling me that the place he sends his bandsaw mill's blades to for resharpening them has a service where they "roll" the blade after sharpening.
He said that, if you lay the blade on a flat surface, it should touch that surface all the way around. But, after a certain amount of use, the blade can stretch. And, when it stretches, it stretches unevenly from front (teeth side) to back. He says it's that unevenness that keeps the blade from laying flat. And, once the blade has stretched in that way, it may well be a lot harder, if not impossible to get it to track.
So his point was:---- This company has some sort of method for slightly stretching the side of the blade that is the shortest, so it will lay flat again. I assume that would be the back side of the blade.
That conversation took place 4 or 5 years ago and he has since left the community, so I can't go back to him for clarification. My "roll" term may not be correct.

I have a couple of small bandsaws (one 4X6 HF and one steel/wood) where this isn't a big deal. If I have a severe tracking problem (which almost never happens), it's probably time to replace the blade anyway. But on my 36" wheel bandsaw the blades are pretty expensive, so If I have to have one sharpened, I'd also like the have it come back straight.

Does anybody have knowledge of this process, or of its proper name?

Pete Stanaitis
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grub54891

Registered
Age
63
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
Haven't heard of that, but I suppose the sharpening process would slightly heat that side of the blade. When it cools, it retaines some of the expansion. Just in my head, the only way to correct it would be to heat the opposite side. If the blade was sharpend with a coolant flowing, it shouldn't happen though. Interesting.....
 

WalterE

Registered
An Amish guy was telling me that the place he sends his bandsaw mill's blades to for resharpening them has a service where they "roll" the blade after sharpening.
He said that, if you lay the blade on a flat surface, it should touch that surface all the way around. But, after a certain amount of use, the blade can stretch. And, when it stretches, it stretches unevenly from front (teeth side) to back. He says it's that unevenness that keeps the blade from laying flat. And, once the blade has stretched in that way, it may well be a lot harder, if not impossible to get it to track.
So his point was:---- This company has some sort of method for slightly stretching the side of the blade that is the shortest, so it will lay flat again. I assume that would be the back side of the blade.
That conversation took place 4 or 5 years ago and he has since left the community, so I can't go back to him for clarification. My "roll" term may not be correct.

I have a couple of small bandsaws (one 4X6 HF and one steel/wood) where this isn't a big deal. If I have a severe tracking problem (which almost never happens), it's probably time to replace the blade anyway. But on my 36" wheel bandsaw the blades are pretty expensive, so If I have to have one sharpened, I'd also like the have it come back straight.

Does anybody have knowledge of this process, or of its proper name?

Pete Stanaitis
--------------
Peter,
That would be for large and wide blades like you would find on a sawmill head rig (not a portable bandmill). These are blades that might be 6" wide. Probably not what you have.
 

Kothe

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2020
check with Cooks band saw , they make and sell bandmills and provide the service that you are asking about , they have made and sharpened blades for my bandmill over the years also have a large assortments of parts for sale
Nelson
 
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