Ross Naylor's Advance Model

Travis McCoy

Subscriber
Sam,

That is an awesome piece of work! I hope someday I can own one that size.

Perfect time of year to build a fire and raise some steam.

-Travis
 
The famous brass log chain! No, I did not. I don't think it was with the engine when it sold the first time, but I could be wrong about that. I would really like to know where it is now. He was always afraid someone would steal it it, so he stamped RN on every link! Should be easy to identify if it still exists.
 
Last edited:

casertractor

Subscriber
That is a great looking Advance model:D.Congratulations Sam on getting the engine i am glade to see your going to keep it going.Have fun with it and enjoy it:)
 
What scale is this engine?
Well, that question doesn't have an exact answer. Ross always said it was a 2/5 size model of a 16 HP Advance, which is a scale of 4.8" to the foot. However, if you take the full size dimensions of a 16 HP Advance and multiply them by 2/5 (or divide by 4.8) none of them match up anywhere close with the way it actually turned out as built. As far as the figures go, it comes closer to being a 1/2 size of a 12HP Advance. I really think he just made a boiler about the size he wanted and built everything in proportion around it. It is smaller than a 1/2 size and larger than a 1/3. He used to say it was impossible to build one exactly to scale because first of all you can't build a scale fire.

What ever his thinking, it wound up being what he though was the perfect size. It was big enough to ride on, powerful enough to do some real work and small enough for one man to load and unload cold, by himself. And it didn't take an elaborate outfit to haul it around. He had a 4' x 8' tandem axle trailer and pulled it with a 1/2 Chevy pickup. However, before that (about 1983) he pulled it with a 1970 four door Chevy Impala with a straight six and three speed column shift.

But the 2/5 size answer usually seemed to satisfy all inquiries that were made to Ross about the scale, so I guess I'll continue to use that for an answer whenever I am asked.
 
Last edited:
If I recall, it did start out life as a boiler barrel that he found and he and another individual fit everything to it. I can't recall the other guys name that helped him with it. He had the machine shop. That size was common then, then the slightly larger, but still smaller than the modern half sizes started to show up. Many of those had the Soliman boilers in this area
 
If I recall, it did start out life as a boiler barrel that he found and he and another individual fit everything to it. I can't recall the other guys name that helped him with it. He had the machine shop. That size was common then, then the slightly larger, but still smaller than the modern half sizes started to show up. Many of those had the Soliman boilers in this area
Bob Hauetter of Parkville, Missouri was the guy who helped him with it. He was also a garage and wrecker operator like Ross, but had a fairly complete machine shop as well. Bob had built a 1/3 size double cylinder Rumely and later went on to build two other half size Rumelys. The first and second one were later owned by Ralph Levings and the third was at one time owned by Clarence Turnbull and the boys.

Ross's machine shop consisted of a drill press, a bench grinder, a hacksaw, a vise and a big assortment of files, chisels, scrapers, taps and dies. Bob did everything that required a lathe or milling machine. For instance, Bob milled out the shape of the connecting rod, but left the ends solid. Ross took that home and chain drilled and sawed out the square holes for the ends and using gages he fashioned from scrap trimmings from automobile exhaust pipes, filed them to receive the bronze end boxes.

An awful lot of it was sawn into shape with a hacksaw. He could go on and on about the merits and faults of various brands of hacksaw frames and blades. His favorites were a Millers Falls No. 84 frame and Starrett or Lennox blades

There was a guy a couple of doors down from Ross's garage that had a welding shop. He built the boiler and did most of the other welding and brazing jobs. I don't remember what his name was. It was built on a 15" boiler barrel much like, as you pointed out, most of the Solomon boilers were.

In many ways it looks more like it was built by a blacksmith than a machinist, but I have never seen another engine that more resembled its builder than this one. Short coupled, feisty, a little rough around the edges...Ross was all of that and so was his engine. I don't think I'll change a thing.
 
Last edited:

AR14949

New member
This is the kind of spit and vinegar we expect from an Advance.

---------- Post added at 09:41:39 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:39:33 PM ----------

In response to Dan's quote about a third scale thinking it was a full scale.
 
Top