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Saw Dust

Hubbie

Registered
Age
55
I'm just wondering what other woodworkers do with the saw dust you create. Me personally, it goes to someone that has same animals, compost, the fireplace, or the trash. It all depends on what the wood is. Mike
 

Pat Barrett

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Re: Saw dust

I usta save my lead shot bags, fill with saw dust, take to the feed store and
have end sewn up and use for shooting rest.
 

radiodoc

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2021
I was told once when I was a kid that some unscrupulous car dealers back in the early days would mix with the grease in the transmission and rear ends of old tired worn out cars to make the gears work smooth for a while.
 

Philipagri

Registered
I was told once when I was a kid that some unscrupulous car dealers back in the early days would mix with the grease in the transmission and rear ends of old tired worn out cars to make the gears work smooth for a while.
Not an uncommon practice with old Fordson Standard tractors here in UK.
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
I was told once when I was a kid that some unscrupulous car dealers back in the early days would mix with the grease in the transmission and rear ends of old tired worn out cars to make the gears work smooth for a while.
My old pal Bill took the top off the 4-speed in his 58 Chevy pickup and while it was idling slowly, fed it about 1 cubic foot of sawdust.
He said it really did quiet things down but I don't know how long it lasted.
We used to have to change spark plugs while driving around on Saturday night cuz the old straight 6 would foul them so quick and start missing. He kept a couple in the glove box and the passenger would clean the one we just pulled out and throw it back in the glovebox for later.
It had a straight exhaust stack coming up behind the cab made out of an old driveshaft. He used to wind up the engine then shut off the ignition and guys in the back would drop cans down the stack.
When he turned the ignition back on it would launch them way high! It finally got to knocking and missing so bad he pulled the head off and surprise- the top of the Piston was broken clear off. I believe the Rings just held it at the top of the bore, while the skirt portion went up and down on the rod
The thing burned so much oil previously that he used to put drain/waste oil In it from the service station.
His theory was the oil had maybe had two or three thousand miles on it when it got drained; and it was only going to stay in his engine another couple days or at the rate of perhaps 50 miles or so per quart!
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
We moderns don't very often think of it as insulation. But apparently it would keep the Ice House from melting All Summer Long. Of course a lot did melt but they had a lot more in there.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Dalmatiangirl61 I use pine shavings in the chicken house and the cedar shaving in the nesting boxes.
If you ever need to transport cats (ie roadtrip), trust me, newspaper or cardboard in the carrier is worthless, use pine shavings instead, unless you want to :barf:
 

Bear67

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/02/2020
Back when I used to make lots of sawdust (cabinet shop) I poured it into wet spots in the pasture roads. Don't make so much anymore. My wife still works with fifth graders in an outdoor learning facility. They make lots of fires and I mix a small amount of diesel in a five gallon bucket of sawdust and easy fire starter when it is damp and the wood is too green or wet.

Made me think--I have 4 big insulation bags of planer shavings in the barn. These are from Eastern red cedar lumber that we cut logs, sawed on bandsaw mill and I used for projects. It really smells good. At one time I had 10,000 BF of red cedar in the barn. Almost all used up now. When my daughters were still living at home, they would take a cup of these shavings and sew them into a small bag to be used in their clothes chests, dressers, and maybe the closet. Supposed to make their undies smell nice and keep out insects. I probably have 5 cu yds of the stuff if the mice or rats have not eaten the plastic bags. These were 12 mil bags and I do keep rat/mouse bait out. I guess I need to give these to someone who is bedding animals. We use wheat straw in the chicken nests.

I once offered some to Herpatolgist friend to use with his snakes. He said only hardwood shavings for snakes. Don't know if he knew what he was talking about, but I don't raise snakes either--at least on purpose.
 
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