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Scrap Steel, Iron, Brass and Aluminum Recycling

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: Scrap?

I really hated to scrap this one.....

18 foot aluminum loading dock bridge that I had planned on bolting 3 torsion axles under and making a tri-axle trailer for hauling my road roller on. But, when you get desperate for bill paying money, things gotta go. With a double layer of 3/4 inch diamond plate making an inch & a half thick deck, 1/2 inch diamond plate boxed side rails, 12 inch I-beam main rails 4 inch H-beam cross beams and 6 inch center I-beams, it netted me a grand when I scrapped it a few years ago. Kind of waste doing that with it, as it was probably worth several thousand if someone needed it for it's original purpose.... but when you need money fast you can't always do what you want to or should do.
Ouch! That would have made a sweet trailer. Wish I could find a 25 to 30 ft aluminum ramp like that, for less than scrap price of course. I really need a good gooseneck flatbed trailer to move some of my shop stuff, the aluminum ones are nice, but unless you are hauling 24/7 its hard to justify the cost.
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Re: Scrap?

The only downside to using that for a trailer was the overall width minus the raised side rails made for a narrow deck.

I had my 81 Mazda RX7 parked on it for several years to keep it high off the ground (& well ventilated to keep it dry) with room to spare on the sides, but my 79 Ford pickup was about 2 inches too wide on tread width to fit on it so it wouldn't have been much good as a car hauler for full sized vehicles.

But, it was just the right size for the old Buffalo Springfield Road Roller though and would have been perfect for hauling that.
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
Re: Scrap?

I went digging in an old range a few years ago, found a 5 gallon bucket full of beat up 38s, 357s, and 45s. 80 pounds in all, all in under 20 minutes of digging. Got 25 cents a pound for it! Dollar a minute aint hard to take!
Andrew
 

Beanscoot

Registered
Occasionally local schools here get a scrap bin dropped off and hold a fund raising scrap drop off.

The beauty of this is that the scrap place drops off and retrieves the bin at no charge and pays for the metal, so every bit of junk brings in money. People root around their houses and yards for metal to bring in and the volunteers have been great about letting people buy up junk (I mean make a donation, then take it) before it goes into the bin.

It's a much better way to fund raise than having people spend lots of time making crafty knick-knacks that nobody wants, and guilting people into buying it.

As a side note, the last time I looked into bringing in a couple old car engines to the scrap, the best price I found was 1.5 cents a pound.
Not much incentive for beating up my body and truck bringing them in. Hopefully we'll have another school scrap drive this spring to encourage me.
 

Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
I love hauling scrap and been doing it since I started driving in 1985. Recently tore down a library wing on a Cleveland mansion and salvaged all the copper from the roof and a few gutters. My van was loaded from front to back. Ended up with 760 lbs and netted $1533. That was a good day. :D
 

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Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
Just tore the library down and I also tore out a 13’ deep swimming pool and an outdoor hot tub in a grotto like setting behind the library. The library itself was a $1.5M addition about 18 years ago and it all went in a dumpster. I was told the pool was built at the same time with the prospect of attracting Lebron James as a buyer, but that never happened and the pool was never used and the house sat vacant for about 8 years. The main house remains which was built in 1919. The current owners are billionaires.
 

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Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
Here’s a video from when I pushed the roof beams down. There were two 40’ I beams supporting the widow’s walk and skylights on the roof.

The library was a beautiful building, but was demolished mainly because of a personal dislike for the previous owner who built it and had his image in it in a couple places.

 

Beanscoot

Registered
That's tragic.
It's the equivalent of cutting up for scrap a nice restored antique engine. But of course people can do what they want with their property.
 

Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
It may have been tragic for the library, but it put a fair amount of cash in my pocket to spend on acquiring and preserving old iron.:D It wasn’t historically significant and had a sort of morally negative past.
 

Ken Karrow

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/10/2019
Years ago my dad worked in a fair sized machine shop in a factory. He had worked out a deal to get the scrap (chips and stub ends) for mowing the lawn. On Saturday when I was home on leave (1967) he said let us go mow. Threw a couple of mowers in his old '52 chev pu then he said we need to air up the tires. Had 6 ply tires and aired them to 80#. Thought that strange but OK. Went to his plant an mowed the lawn, with two of us took 10 min. Then he unlocked the overhead and backed the truck in and used the over head crane to load barrels. Sorted into ferrus, red brass, yellow brass, aluminum. Set that old pu frames on the axle. Only a couple miles to scrap yard. Unloaded and back for another. Can't remember how much, but the owner treated us to a beer while his employed took care of things and tied the empties in his truck. And I know the roll of banknotes had Franklin's on the outside.
 

Ryan Anderson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/09/2020
I am enjoying reading about all these junking escapades.

I do have many questions, though. What do you need to do to maximize the profit from your scrap? There's time involved in sorting, taking apart dissimilar metals, and cutting to the preferred size. I've heard that the yards want a certain size and will pay more for it, but I've never had any luck getting that information because they don't want to waste time talking to a guy that may come in once a year like me.

Should ferrous or aluminum metals be sorted by cast and steel or other? For the example of the wheel weights, how much more would they pay with the steel clips removed from the lead? What about things like modern radiators with the plastic tanks and Al cores. What if I have a piece of cast Al with a Fe bolt stuck in it? Should that bolt be removed? What about insulation on copper wires? I remember I burned it off one time and the yard frowned on that. I've found that they have an electric motor price that was low at the time. Would you unwind the copper out of them for more cash? What about lead acid batteries? What do you do with old appliances to prepare them?

The e-waste is a new one to me. I have not heard of the yards paying for e-waste around here. Are there any other things that we throw away that may be worth taking in for some cash?

What are the general tips and tricks of the trade?
 

Pat Barrett

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Here at work, a couple guys, come around twice a month, picking up certain size pallets. Spoke to some companies around here, and good used unbroken up pallets of the correct size for each's use bring around $5.00 each.
 

Target Driller

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/15/2019
Twice / yr. We haul roughly (20) 5-gal full pails of range brass of all sizes and caliber from our rifle range to our local scrap yard., Brass seems to fluctuate between $1.90 - $2.20 per pound. They prod each bucket for any steel casings with a powerful magnet and if any steel casings are found then the price drops significantly. We do our best to sort each bucket of brass prior to making the trek to the scrap yard. The cash is always put towards purchasing presents for our Xmas party for the kids.
 

Pat Barrett

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Years ago, I could go to the Highway Patrol range. The men would go out there, one at a time to fulfill the range time requirement. All would go to the first stand. After a rain, I could get about 2 gallon buckets of 38's. Since it was cast already, it was the right alloy and just needed re-melting into pigs and re-cast.
 

Hubbie

Registered
Age
55
Right now the prices for scrap copper,brass and aluminum are down quite a bit from a few years ago. I use to get $1000 a load and now get about half that for the same load
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
I just scrapped my 1994 K 1500 Yukon. The frame was so totally rotted, the rear springs went thru the body! Got 75 cents a 100wt. he probably will make twice that, selling off parts - tires like new, less than a year old, new battery, alternator and radiator. Good 700R-4 trans and 4 WD that worked well. Sorry to see it go, but it was time. 270,000 miles on it, the salt on the roads is what ate it up. That and the crappy GM clear coat that was falling off!:mad:
 
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