• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When registering, please provide your CITY and STATE as your location!

Single Cylinder, Water Cooled, Unidentified Engine

Thaumaturge

In Memory Of
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Re: Single cylinder, water cooled, unidentified engine

I'd still swear it was marine oriented. Mount, extra heavy flywheel, piped I/O water jacket and reduced speed output all too consistant. (Notice output shaft on cam? Reduced 2:1.) Exhaust piped for submerged output.

Would sure like to see pics of other two views.
Doc
 

Maytag

Registered
Age
85
Re: Single cylinder, water cooled, unidentified engine

Thanks, Thaumaturge... It has no markings of any kind. Here are a couple more pictures.
 

Attachments

RustySteele

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/11/2019
Re: Single cylinder, water cooled, unidentified engine

It looks like an engine that was used on some of the early light plants. I agree that it isn`t marine, the extended camshaft in the back is too small to run a prop, it might have run a water pump for cooling.
 

miro

Registered
Re: Single cylinder, water cooled, unidentified engine

With a 2 cycle engine - if the exhaust is submerged, you would never get it to start - the exhaust port is blocked..
Once a 2 cycle is running, then yes a submerged exhaust is OK.
On more modern outboard engines , you'll find a small set of ports just above the waterline that lets enough exhaust out so that it fires.

miro
 

PFT

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2020
Re: Single cylinder, water cooled, unidentified engine

The only thing that makes me think it is not marine is the raised output shaft. On marine engines they usually want the shaft as low as possible, but this might be an exception.
PT
 

Clark Colby

Registered
This engine looks remarkably similar to a circa 1903 Kowalsky 4-1/2" bore & stroke automobile engine made in Verona, and/or Latrobe, Pennsylvania. The ignition timer mounts on the light-duty extended camshaft. A unique feature of the Kowalsky automobile engine was that access to remove both valves required loosening only a single setscrew. The advertisement shows a simpler crankcase casting, but two versions could possibly have been produced. I have not been able to determine whether Kowalsky actually made this engine or bought it from another obscure maker. Suspiciously, Kowalsky's automobile engine design bears no resemblance to his marine or stationary engine designs.
 
Top