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Small Four Cylinder Flathead Identity Sought

Peter Short

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2017
I have a small flathead four cylinder engine – maker unknown. However there are some unusual features on the little engine, perhaps kind reader you will recognise and identify the maker.

- To give an idea of the engines size - the flywheel measures approximately 300mm, say 12" diameter. The cylinder head is 410mm long (16"), spark plug centres 95mm (3 3/4') so bore somewhat less than this.

-Barrel crankcase i.e. crankshaft can only be fitted from the end.

-There is no sump, just a sheetmetal cover plate. What looks like a separate cast iron tank for oil (below magneto).

-Finned exhaust manifold is part of the block.

-Removable head.

-Carb is Mayer Carburettor Co. Buffalo, New York.

-Magneto: Severn HT4, USA.

-Engine mounts? Not a lot....there are the two square-head screws on the rear face of the block at mid-level and the snout of the timing cover has a machined outside diameter.

-Cone clutch.

-No starter motor.

-Priming cups fitted on side of cylinder head.

- Spark plugs (KLG A30) are 7/8" - 18 TPI.

-Threads and hex sizes are probably American rather than British (not 100% sure yet).

-Spigot on head looks suitable for short arm-mounted cooling fan, driven from magneto drive extension.

Thanks for any help!
 

Attachments

Dwayne Fuller

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Peter, Interesting old engine. You may get more response if you post this in the antique truck section on smokstak.
 

Bud Tierney

Registered
That's the third finned-exhaust inline that's been on here...the first, in one piece, some time back and perhaps in AU (it had a portion of the fins ground off to make room for what was guesstimated to be a distributor replacement)...the second one, disassembled, very recently...I don't believe either got a definite ID, but I haven't tried to bring them up...
 

DKamp

Registered
I have no clue... but it's definitely COOL!

The 'character' suggests that it's older than say... 1928... and although it doesn't have any obvious 'features' that make it so, it kinda looks 'marine'.

I dunno if Caille ever made a four like this, but the crankshaft removal cover setup just kinda looks Caille'y...:shrug:
 

Richard H. Gambrell

Registered
Age
67
Many, many years ago, I looked at a Studebaker engine and that kind of reminds me of that one. It has been 45 years ago, so I can't say for sure.
Richard
 

Peter Short

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2017
Thanks everyone for your replies so far. I haven't looked yet for the other similar engines posted here (thanks Bud), will do so.

Richard,
this engine is pretty small - e.g. cylinder head is only 16" long - a bit small for Studebaker?
 

nblack

Registered
Agree with the consensus. Definitely looks marine. Dry sump, maybe had the external water pump driven by the accessory drive in front of the LT magneto? Interestingly, the intake manifold is cast into the block. Another thing I noticed is that the plugs are two piece, which puts it in the range of years as a Model T, (I think). The sprocket has me baffled, though, unless it was part of a double chain coupling. Which seems kinda out of the rest of the engines supposed time period. What are your plans with it? Is it even still loose?
 

Peter Short

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2017
Would a marine engine have a cone clutch?

There doesn't seem to be any corrosion in the water pipes (e.g.salt water cooling).
 

SteamfanMN

Registered
Did you ever find out what this was? Very neat engine!! I wouldn't mind finding something unique as this. Could you possibly look up engines that used that carb? Or search by something unique to this engine? Like that cone clutch or dry sump.
 

SteamfanMN

Registered
While highly unlikely I would like to suggest maybe some sort of rail speeder engine? I don't know why it would be dry sump though if it is :shrug: otherwise I'd say marine application of some sorts.
 

Peter Short

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2017
Hi Steamfan,

I haven't found out any more on this engine, I was hoping someone would recognise it, but not so far...

I have tried searching on the Mayer carb and the Severn mag, but haven't found any list of users so far.

I didn't find anything much about the magneto.

The carb search turns up more info, e.g. an advert from 1913 and one or two for sale.

Also a website which features carbs for the Ford Model T - seems like there were a lot of carburettor manufacturers out there! The Mayer carb for the Model T is arranged differently, but looks to use the same basic design.

Quote: This is a Mayer. They are an interesting carb. This one is restored and running and for sale. It is one of the self regulating type, it has five little brass balls that raise off their seats to regulate the air flow and mixture. Very well built, higher quality than many of the carbs are.


http://www.strombergof.com/Other_Carburetors.php
 

Bud Tierney

Registered
Do put this on oldmarineengine..Richard Durgee there is a mine of old marine engine info; if it's US marine, he'll probably know it---I believe he posts here, but may not've seen this...
If the marine end doesn't pan out, you might do a little research on CycleCar engines...the 1913 carb ad puts it in the right time period for them, and some quite small 4cyl's were developed for those builders that wanted something smoother than the usual MC engines...
 

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