State Boiler Inspections

gibbykart

Subscriber
Here it is the night before my first boiler that i have owned, getting inspected tomorrow morning, I trimmed the grass around it nice and tidy and hope all goes well but i have this nice reoccurring bad luck when it comes to big things like this. Fortunately i have been told that the inspector for my area is a nice guy to deal with. My question to you is: How did you feel the day/night before your first inspection? Just for feelers out there :p -Mike
 

Richard Miller

Subscriber
The first inspection is kind of like a job interview, you don't know what the outcome will be!! Relax, he is there to help you make sure this boiler is safe to operate and has the proper safety equipment installed and that you know how to handle them properly. He will also advise you to any changes or upgrades he deems necessary. Be polite, use good manners and respect his position!! BEST OF LUCK!!
 

cyberbadger

New member
Hope it goes well for you gibbykart!

My first visit for my non code boiler was a curtesy by the Ohio Inspetor. He really couldn't inspect anything legally and he couldn't say anything legally. But he was very helpful and fair and gave me off the record 'suggestions'.

It's funny in my situation because now I'm getting a brand new ASME code boiler but I talked to the same state inspector and he could inspect it, but it doesn't make sense in my application. In Ohio they won't touch anything marine, and if you change the configuration it voids the certification. :crazy:

-CB
 

mosseater

New member
Really want to hear how this comes out. Please fill us in with the details. I'll stay tuned for more. Good luck!
 

gibbykart

Subscriber
Well as of this morning it was monsooning so he ask if we could move it back to another date. So the 17th it is. -mike
 

sftyvlv1

New member
He can make you or break you. Don't pissed the man off. As mentioned he probably is a good man and there to help.
Have to do deal with this often as our district welding inspector is also the boiler inspector.
 

T James Ives

Subscriber
Here in the UK, we do not have state inspectors. They are all independent and usually self employed.
The 'regulation' comes from the insurance companies. To operate in public we have to have the required insurance, so to cover their backs the insurers insist on boiler certs. Most inspectors do the proper job. Some do not. I had my boiler inspected by a " drive by" inspector as he had done it previously. I am now having it done properly by a reputable guy.
I know the boiler is ok having done a hydraulic test to 300 psi. But this guy is sitting at home when it might have blown-- it was ok when I saw it.
What about me sitting on it?
Like a lot of things over here the state does not get involved... Thank goodness.
Our beloved cousins in the European Union a few years ago said that any surface hotter than 120 deg F should be guarded with a mesh screen wherever it was. It was pointed out that every steam engine would instantly be inoperable. They made allowances for heritage engines and locos.
We over here appear not to be so rigid in regulations, although there are noises that may make things a bit more difficult.
 

IronworkerFXR

Subscriber
The key is a Knowledgeable inspector. I have had building inspected by inspectors that pretty much know nothing and failed the inspection, had to wait a few days , another inspector and an all ok sigh off. Nothing Changed except the inspector.

A good inspector is there for your benefit.
 

BoilerGuy

Member
You should have Bob E or Gean P Both are Good Guys and will be fair, just have the Hydro test ready to go and a proper relief valve and the fuse plug must be ASME.
 

Rob Bryce

New member
^^ what these guys said. I stressed a fair bit when the Case was first certified, but at the end, I had a lot of help from friends, the engine was certainly ready and the inspectors were more than fair, reasonable, and helpful. My experience is consistent with what we've been seeing here in Manitoba for a while now. It was an enjoyable experience; I hope yours is too.

--Rob
 

gibbykart

Subscriber
Some trouble with the inspection today as I did not have the data i needed to be able to get it done, Bob E did come out and we talked about the boiler and others for quite a while, Now I need to wait to hear back from the Ast Chief in Lansing to go to the next step. A vertical firetube does not need to have a fusible plug right? There is only about 4 feet of water between operating level and the top of the flue sheet. So it is about 200 gallons by my figures. Correct me if i am wrong. -Mike
 

cyberbadger

New member
A vertical firetube does not need to have a fusible plug right?
Totally depends on your State's law and your State's inspectors.

For an ASME vertical firetube boiler a fusible plug has been required depending on the edition of the ASME code. :bonk:

For a VFT it goes on the bottom tubesheet so one side is in the firebox, and the otherside is cooled by water.

Your boiler is not an ASME vessel, so I don't know what your state inspectors will require.

I'm rooting for you gibbykart/Mike. Hope you can get the boiler certified.:wave:

-CB
 

Richard Miller

Subscriber
All my VFT boilers that have fusible plugs are threaded directly into extra heavy tubes and have a hand hole at that location! These are located considerably higher than the crown sheet. We have two Mich certified vertical boilers with no fusible plugs at this time because the state does not require them, they are on a voluntary basis, subject to change.
 
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