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Texan Asking

Billy J Shafer

Subscriber
Age
69
Last Subscription Date
09/03/2019
I watch Out Back Truckers. Mainly to see the land down there. In some ways it is like Texas. You don't want to have problems in the bush. I understand it is a tv show made for tv. But is it really that bad in some spots. Some spots you could wait days for help. Some roads during the rainy season. You need luck to get down. I would love to come down there for a visit.
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
Re: Texan asking.

I watch Out Back Truckers. Mainly to see the land down there. In some ways it is like Texas. You don't want to have problems in the bush. I understand it is a tv show made for tv. But is it really that bad in some spots. Some spots you could wait days for help. Some roads during the rainy season. You need luck to get down. I would love to come down there for a visit.
You'd only be stranded life threateningly on some of the REALLY remote roads. Even towns famously considered "outback" usually have sealed roads in with at the very least a few vehicles a day travelling.

During "the wet" gravel roads can and do often turn into quagmires, and sealed highways do too if there's enough cyclonic rain.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Re: Texan asking.

You'd only be stranded life threateningly on some of the REALLY remote roads.
And if your well prepared (ie telling someone your itinerary) your life is never threatened.
On those outback trucker shows a lot is put on. Have you ever seen the sound man grab a shovel and help?
But if you want to wander about aimlessly then the biggest thing to watch out for is the bloke from Wolf Creek and drop bears.

Cheers Scott
 

Paul Richardson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Re: Texan asking.

I think Billy the answer would be yes in some of the remote areas.'wet season' driving in some locations means closing some roads by municipalities at their starting point.
Think of Texas being the size of the lower 48.Population is mostly confined to our coastal regions,mostly East Coast and Southern corners.Every now and then we register another tragedy in outback locations,where an unprepared visitor will be stranded on an outback dirt road without adequate water.High temps and very little traffic means dehydration and disaster within a fairly short time.
I have a friend who was doing some of that kind of general freight and some specialised haulage into very remote places here.He has a ton of photos of impassable wet dirt road,removing excavator which was his freight from the float to pull his truck out of a bog.
About 40 years ago I spent a few months with the local shooter between White Cliffs and Tibooburra.We got stuck on a dry creek on the main dirt road between those two.We were there a day and a half before another vehicle arrived.Its not considered super remote.I see a few years back I visited there again and the dry creeks have bitumen crossings now.A 'soldier settlers' block in that part of the country was around 200,000 acres,carrying around 13,000 sheep at peak numbers.My friend the shooter had about 5 such properties as his territory.
 

FWurth

One Millionth Post
Last Subscription Date
07/29/2019
Re: Texan asking.

Sounds like my kind of place! :D
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Re: Texan asking.

Billy J, All of those TV shows follow the same theme. The've got to have drama in them . All set up for the show.Wouldn't mind betting they're all made by the same company. All full of bull...t, but with some interesting bits to make you keep watching. Like the pickers going to a place they've never been before and knocking on the door,and their cameraman is already inside filming!--- Jeez, Do they think we don't notice things like that!--- Met a few Texans in my life, all seem nice friendly people. Seem to like the same things we do. Similar lifestyle I guess.
 

john gilbert

Registered
Re: Texan asking.

Hi All , to our USA mates, I have traveled round the White Cliffs - Tibooburra area a bit, and can say the country there is very much like the Canyon De Chelly to Hollbrook and south area in Arizona. Just no towns or bitumen roads and the only traffic would be local farmers and they are very few and extremely far between. Your neighbour could be up to 50 miles away and virtually NO TOURISTS on that road in Oz t all.
Cheers John ( ps, I just love Arizona especially around Sedona )
 

karragullengine

Registered
Re: Texan asking.

Billy J, All of those TV shows follow the same theme. The've got to have drama in them . All set up for the show.Wouldn't mind betting they're all made by the same company. All full of bull...t, but with some interesting bits to make you keep watching. Like the pickers going to a place they've never been before and knocking on the door,and their cameraman is already inside filming!--- Jeez, Do they think we don't notice things like that!--- Met a few Texans in my life, all seem nice friendly people. Seem to like the same things we do. Similar lifestyle I guess.
Most accurate documentary would be russell coights all aussie adventures. If troy dann did nothing else at least he inspired this show to be made.
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Re: Texan asking.

Now there's a show, Russell coight. I loved it. At least you knew he was trying to be a drongo, and entertaining us at the same time. The others expect us to believe they're not drongos!
 

Paul Richardson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Re: Texan asking.

Yes All Aussie Adventures is worth a watch.People here are quite often more intrigued by watching the ice road truckers!

Some time in the 90's I met a chef from San Francisco.I was hanging around with a nameless bunch of drunks which was where we met."Jeff the Chef" he was dubbed,and we made a plan to go near White Cliffs on a 'bit of a drive' to experience a meal of the local yabbies(type of local craw-dad) up that way,just enjoy a drive.Just on dusk there was an explosion of feathers and the hood rose up about a foot,just 20 miles from our destination.An emu made a risky high speed crossing and punched the front of my old truck.We had left the bitumen road behind for the dirt about 4 hours earlier.
As soon as we had rolled to a stop Jeff was out collecting wood for a signal fire,which I thought was pretty funny.He had no idea that we were only a few hours of walking to the homestead of the place I wanted to spend the night on.The impact had split the housing of my water pump,and slotted the top tank of the radiator with the fan blade.I carried a spare water pump,knowing the risk in that country,so I fitted it.I tried all sorts of ideas to fix the radiator but had no faith in any.Jeff pleaded with me to let him try some Pizza dough,to make it like a putty were he was sure it would cook and plug the massive slot underneath the top tank.Jeff had never owned a motor car,so according to me he wouldn't be much help providing a solution to the water problem.
I relented thinking we had nothing to lose by trying.He handed me his favourite mix and I put it in by the handful,then left the radiator cap loose.Not long afterwards we were driving again ok,and were soon at the station homestead where we wanted to be.The farmer on that block had some better two pack putty that we redid the plug with.and after meeting with some more friends of Bill W in Broken Hill,we were gifted a second hand radiator that would fit.We went south from there to Kangaroo island just for the ferry trip and the drive.
 

Billy J Shafer

Subscriber
Age
69
Last Subscription Date
09/03/2019
I know that most of it is made up for tv. I just enjoy it for the country. I did learn one thing. The cattle are just as stupid as the ones we have here. They will go out of their way just to stand in front of you.

That video where they are towing the drilling rigs in. Looks the same that we have. We call it sugar sand. Hit a pocket of that and you will get stuck. It is like dry water.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
learned a new word! drongo, i know i will use that one! :brows:now that i know what it means, thanks for including a link to look it up!:D:wave:
 

Scotty 2

Registered
learned a new word! drongo, i know i will use that one! :brows:now that i know what it means, thanks for including a link to look it up!:D:wave:
So did you know about the bloke from Wolf Creek and drop bears? :O :rolleyes:




---------- Post added at 07:18:11 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:05:53 AM ----------

I don't know, my brother is a water driller and that show is a watered down version of his daily life trying to get here and there. https://youtu.be/XSw4dmCMbQU
Did he mention how deep they had to go to get water there?
When I worked we had the opposite trouble getting to places to put in power poles/lines, do line maintenance or respond to power outages around Northern NSW. We only had some bush/jungle, hills, cliffs, lightning storms (usually at night in torrential rain) and hippies to contend with. :rant:
Ahhh the memories :rolleyes:
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
i watched the first 5 or so minutes of the video, i will have to watch the rest later! when he set the fire extinguisher off i damn near spit my drink out.:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
 

Scotty 2

Registered
i watched the first 5 or so minutes of the video, i will have to watch the rest later! when he set the fire extinguisher off i damn near spit my drink out.:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
Welcome to Australia!!!
We have a young German girl who stayed here for awhile and she has just returned here to do her Masters degree. She reckons one of the best things about dinky dies is their ability to laugh at themselves.
 

cobbadog

Registered
G'Day Tex,
You really have to make it out here one day to get a feel of how much fun we make of everything.

Have a go ya mug!
 

jgreen416

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/23/2020
I don’t recall what years I saw them but can remember being fascinated by the carefree nature of adventurer and storyteller Alby Mangels. I was amazed by how quickly he took to some aviation adventures without much apparent training. He was a cool dude.
JG
 

Paul Richardson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
learned a new word! drongo, i know i will use that one! :brows:now that i know what it means, thanks for including a link to look it up!:D:wave:
...a couple of things to remember Tracy,when you get going on dishing out that new "drongo" word on the unsuspecting friends and passers by,...the word carries a very similar meaning and intent to "galah",which is also a bird,..a large pink parrot,known for it's ridiculous antics.
The other thing that often happens is that the word is often prefixed with a "bloody" or a "flamin'",..depending on the emotion,..and depending also on the reason for offering the "drongo" his pedigree:D

....Billy,if you ever do make a run this way I'm sure you would be made very welcome,..and don't forget,when you end up getting really "pissed" down this way,it's not such a bad thing,except for the hangover.
 

Attachments

John Newman Jr.

Subscriber
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Well, this thread sure brought back a lot of memories for me.
Way back... December 1985 into January 1986 I was fortunate enough to get to the Land Down Under. Had the time of my life!
Arrived in Sidney and rented a lovely little Holden Astra with a manual transmission (by request). Driving on the 'wrong' side of the road was a bit confusing at first, but I managed. Shifting with my left hand was not an issue. Figured that one out easily. My greatest problem was every time I went to flip on my turning signal (using my left hand out of habit), I ended up with the windshield wipers.
Headed off with no particular direction until I saw a spot on my map showing a little town called Broken Hill. Those with an interest in action movies may recognize that name as the location where they made "The Road Warrior"(Mad Max 2).

After spending the night in an old time hotel in Peterboro I planned to head north on the Stuart Highway. As I started out the next day, I came across a couple standing by the road with signs. One said 'Europeans' the other said 'Petrol Sharing' Now I had company. Alfred and Heike from Germany. We started north.
Once we got beyond the town of Coober Pedy (sp?) the road was no longer paved, but looked more like someone ran two bulldozers side by side across the land and called it a road. It had the surface of a washboard. If you went fast enough, it seemed like you could just kind of skip along the tops of the ridges and it felt fairly smooth. Slow down and you felt every ridge. The trade off was a lack of contact and control at higher speeds, but the ride felt better. We celebrated New Years in a little roadside pub with a beer and kept moving.
Let me take a minute here to ask about rabbits. Are they still a problem / plague? I certainly did my share to reduce their numbers. They were pretty oblivious to vehicular traffic and really made no attempt to get away, so eventually - after I got over my 'Cute Bunny' emotions, they were pretty much just a series of thumpity thump under me. We eventually made it to Alice Springs. The next morning we made the climb to the top of Ayres Rock (now known as Uluru). We stuck together as the trip headed back east and separated at Townsville.
My drive south along the coast was absolutely beautiful. Ended up back in Sydney and that was the end of my 10 day Aussie Adventure. Somewhere in my house is a shoebox full of pictures, but at this moment, I have no idea where. I need to find them.
 
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