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Scotty 2

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I don’t recall what years I saw them but can remember being fascinated by the carefree nature of adventurer and storyteller Alby Mangels.
JG
I was always fascinated by the shielas he had tagging along. A teenage boy could reallllllly like Alby's TV shows and movies if he was ....well....horny. :O
 

Billy J Shafer

Subscriber
Age
69
Last Subscription Date
09/03/2019
Paul.
In 1972 my ship stopped in Hong Kong. Taking a break from the war. Me and a mate met up with two Aussie servicemen. We started out with Fosters and moved on to what ever we could find. We got "pissed" ended up paying twenty each for damage to a bar. I still say we had nothing to do with. Some how the Royal Navy got involved. Then our ships Captain got involved. We were on restriction for a month. I know I had one hell of a hangover.:barf::faint::faint:
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
John Newman, glad you enjoyed your trip out here. That's the best way to do it,as long as you do a bit of homework and ask along the way. The rabbits are mostly gone, due to caleesy (spelling) virus. Used to shoot 150 pair a night spotlighting, good money in those days. The corrugated roads are as you describe. You need to hit a "sweet spot" speed depending on you tyre diameter. ---Billy J Shafer- Talking of getting "pissed" and roads, ever heard of a "gravel alarm clock"? Well , on the narrow bitumen back roads around here, there is always gravel on the verges. When you were pissed and wandered off the road, the gravel hitting under the car would wake up up,- hopefully. Hence-"Gravel Alarm Clock".
 

Paul Richardson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Paul.
In 1972 my ship stopped in Hong Kong. Taking a break from the war. Me and a mate met up with two Aussie servicemen. We started out with Fosters and moved on to what ever we could find. We got "pissed" ended up paying twenty each for damage to a bar. I still say we had nothing to do with.
Well Billy..?..we Aussies welcome you to the "silly bloody galah" club!:D
Starting to read here I saw "started out with Fosters and moved on to whatever we could.." I thought yep,could be Aussies involved,...then saw "got pissed and ended up paying $20 for damages",..prompting my next thought..yep!...flamin drongo's!
Then I see "I still say we had nothing to do with it", ..and thought,..there's a fair chance those cheeky lying Aussie bastards planted that idea in your head while you were well and truly pissed,..knowing full well they started it.:rotfl:
John,like Aussieiron I am pleased to read your report.You realise that the loop you travelled,large as it was,could be expanded x 3 in the direction you took.So happy to hear you talk of cutting your own path and thoroughly enjoying it.
Neil talked about the "rabbiting" that used to be.I was never part of that industry,and only had a brief involvement with the kangaroo harvest.The shooter I worked with had plenty of rabbiting yarns though from just around the start of the 80's,on a place he shot called Quinnepe(sp?).The property was high up on the SA-NSW border somewhere,on the SA side,and was a leasehold property,reported to be 3,300,000acres.
The rabbiting contractor/buyer operated around 20 chillers,.....container size freezers on the property,for his shooters to fill.As Neil pointed out the virus ended most of that industry overnight,although I see the rabbits appear to be making a modest comeback in places.
Speaking of the gravel alarm I met a young bloke in Tasmania who was using it with good results on the way home from a big night out.He told me the gravel showering the foot wells from underneath woke him and saved him twice.He told me how he was startled into consciousness and came to life with a massive correction of the steering wheel to the right,back onto the bitumen road.The third time it happened though it didn't work out so well.He woke again with the big reflex swing to the right,but found out it was the gravel from the right side of the road that woke him.
He came out with more lumps on him than a bag of onions and a nasty head wound.After seeing the old wreck involved I think got off very lightly.
 

Paul Richardson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
I don’t recall what years I saw them but can remember being fascinated by the carefree nature of adventurer and storyteller Alby Mangels. I was amazed by how quickly he took to some aviation adventures without much apparent training. He was a cool dude.
JG
I remember going to a cinema in the late 70's to watch some of Alby's exploits.The episode I saw was quite an adventure,with Alby sailing to remote South Pacific island locations and filling his cargo of disgarded American war service iron,to offload later as scrap.It was a very cool adventure.And thumbs up to his female company as others have noted:brows:

The epic that a lot of Aussies will remember was 'Northern Safari'.I watched it as a school kid in the late 60's.It is a film log of a journey by a couple plus another female relative,travelling from the big smoke up into the gulf country somewhere.The territory where they ventured was very remote wilderness then,and is still very much the same way today.
The movie itself has become quite a property it seems,and all I can find today is a promo.
If I remember right the old sloper car was given an engine transplant by the owner?It would only be a guess now but I think it may have been refitted with a Perkins.
The theme song sticks with me till this day,the chorus and title having been played throughout the movie.
In this pioneering sense we have such a young nation for infrastructure.
In my time,although I never saw it in person that way,the road West to Perth (national highway #1)was a long way from being fully paved.I did cross it a few times as a fully sealed road,once on a motorcycle.
There was another type of promo movie I saw as a kid,and I'm sure the maker was British Petroleum.It was a similar trucking adventure into outback destinations.I have been burning data like a teenager trying to search and find it,but I can't for the life of me get close to finding it.https://youtu.be/RadNxWrePsw
 

jgreen416

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/23/2020
Those aviation exploits I referred to were a time he was piloting a crusty old Cessna 337 push me pull me, set it down on an unimproved roadway and picked up a couple girls. Another instance of where he piloted a Bell 47 with what appeared about 10 minutes of instruction. Agree fully to my having an interest in the look worthy females.
Before I headed down to Billy’s area in Texas in early ‘68 to attend primary helicopter training at Ft Wolters, I had graduated MP school at Ft Gordon. While there, Ihad some interesting times with Aussie soldiers there, played pool, drank some Fosters. A tidbit I remember well was an interesting feature on their uniforms. While we MP’s had landyards for whistle and pistol on our uniforms, the Aussies had a landyard for their drinking cups. There was no mistaking their priorities. Anyway, we had a blooming good time.
JG
 

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