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The horror of Australian bush fires.

Winchester

Registered
The other evening I watched ''Four Corners''. The stark images that were shown brought home to me the absolute horror of these fires which by the way are still burning. I will not venture into my feelings re our government and the inaction as I will get into trouble . But what I must say is that much more in the way of resources for our fire fighters must be forth coming. One thing that I did find an accident waiting to happen was the instance of one fire truck being rendered immovable because the radiant heat had destroyed the hydraulic brake hoses and the brakes had locked on ,fortunately the crew were able to walk to safety. I hope that these brake hoses have been replaced with a type that does not melt .
 

karragullengine

Registered
The other evening I watched ''Four Corners''. The stark images that were shown brought home to me the absolute horror of these fires which by the way are still burning. I will not venture into my feelings re our government and the inaction as I will get into trouble . But what I must say is that much more in the way of resources for our fire fighters must be forth coming. One thing that I did find an accident waiting to happen was the instance of one fire truck being rendered immovable because the radiant heat had destroyed the hydraulic brake hoses and the brakes had locked on ,fortunately the crew were able to walk to safety. I hope that these brake hoses have been replaced with a type that does not melt .
I would hazard a guess they lost air pressure which then locks on the hand brake.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
yes well whatever the cause one would hope that it has been rectified to all fire trucks.
If it wasn't the air pipes getting holes, it could have been fuel lines or wiring or any other number of things that could immobilise a truck.
You can't fireproof a truck unless you want to spend a lot of money. Even then it would be fire resistant, not fire proof.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello again
It should be mentioned that newer trucks coming into service have some really good fire protection measures for the occupants. Sprinkler systems and fire curtains to name a couple.
Thinking about the air hoses for the brakes. Maybe a stick or rock caused a hole/break to make it immobile and not heat? I've been thinking some more.....enough radiant heat to put a hole in a hose is a hell of a lot of heat. How were all the other hoses such as vacuum hoses, inter-cooler hoses and the like? If there was that much radiant heat, how were the batteries?
 

Darryl

Registered
Definitely not mocking the subject that Winchester is correctly making , but it nearly brings a tear to my eye how well Scotty and Winchester are getting along now.
 

lanzalldog

Registered
The other evening I watched ''Four Corners''. The stark images that were shown brought home to me the absolute horror of these fires which by the way are still burning. I will not venture into my feelings re our government and the inaction as I will get into trouble . But what I must say is that much more in the way of resources for our fire fighters must be forth coming. One thing that I did find an accident waiting to happen was the instance of one fire truck being rendered immovable because the radiant heat had destroyed the hydraulic brake hoses and the brakes had locked on ,fortunately the crew were able to walk to safety. I hope that these brake hoses have been replaced with a type that does not melt .
I don't think more resources will solve the problem. I have been a volunteer fire fighter for 30 plus years and there is no way in the world I would put myself in front of those fires.We are volunteers and don't see why we should be risking our lives because of mismanagement to fuel loads and fire trails. Was reading in the Weekly Times that the Victorian government has a fuel load map compiled last August on all of Victoria and will not publically release it because of some unknown reason. It seems to me that throwing resources at a fire after it has escaped is not solving the problem.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
I don't think more resources will solve the problem. I have been a volunteer fire fighter for 30 plus years and there is no way in the world I would put myself in front of those fires.We are volunteers and don't see why we should be risking our lives because of mismanagement to fuel loads and fire trails. Was reading in the Weekly Times that the Victorian government has a fuel load map compiled last August on all of Victoria and will not publically release it because of some unknown reason. It seems to me that throwing resources at a fire after it has escaped is not solving the problem.
Yep, sometimes throwing resources (ie money) at a problem won't always solve the problem. Some of those fires just had to run their course.
It's very disconcerting to hear things like the non-release of fuel load maps by Government (on any level).

Definitely not mocking the subject that Winchester is correctly making , but it nearly brings a tear to my eye how well Scotty and Winchester are getting along now.
Eye of the storm? 😇
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
Hello again
It should be mentioned that newer trucks coming into service have some really good fire protection measures for the occupants. Sprinkler systems and fire curtains to name a couple.
Thinking about the air hoses for the brakes. Maybe a stick or rock caused a hole/break to make it immobile and not heat? I've been thinking some more.....enough radiant heat to put a hole in a hose is a hell of a lot of heat. How were all the other hoses such as vacuum hoses, inter-cooler hoses and the like? If there was that much radiant heat, how were the batteries?

and tyres ??

Ummm ... maybe they were hydraulically cooled air brakes ?
 

Scotty 2

Registered
I don't think more resources will solve the problem. I have been a volunteer fire fighter for 30 plus years and there is no way in the world I would put myself in front of those fires.We are volunteers and don't see why we should be risking our lives because of mismanagement to fuel loads and fire trails. Was reading in the Weekly Times that the Victorian government has a fuel load map compiled last August on all of Victoria and will not publically release it because of some unknown reason. It seems to me that throwing resources at a fire after it has escaped is not solving the problem.
and tyres ??

Ummm ... maybe they were hydraulically cooled air brakes ?
Now your just taking the Micky out of me. Well done. :ROFLMAO:
You even spelt tyres correctly.
 

slip knot

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/27/2019
kinda scary to hear "just let the fire run its course" but up until the very recent past that's exactly what they did. Itseems to me that the Aussie fires are the same as our Cali fires. Land and fuel is mismanaged for years then its a real disaster. But we also don't seem to learn anything from these fires.

Much respect for the guys who go fight these monsters.
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
Now your just taking the Micky out of me. Well done. :ROFLMAO:
You even spelt tyres correctly.
I still haven't figgerd out how losing air pressure would lock on a "hand brake".
You guys must have some really strange designs down there.

.
 

Craig Gillingham

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/04/2017
The biggest problem I see is the pricks lightning these things on purpose. There was a map published in Victoria showing where the highest fuel-loads were, but it was suppressed (I think a good thing) to det. It's often the firebug that starts these things.
 

karragullengine

Registered
The biggest problem I see is the pricks lightning these things on purpose. There was a map published in Victoria showing where the highest fuel-loads were, but it was suppressed (I think a good thing) to det. It's often the firebug that starts these things.
Good point, there is always two sides to a story.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
I still haven't figgerd out how losing air pressure would lock on a "hand brake".
You guys must have some really strange designs down there.
Maxi's. Not really locking on a handbrake. Losing pressure simply locks on THE brakes.
Without knowing which truck burnt it's hard to tell what brakes it had on it. But to lock up because a hose melted.....sounds like maxi's. What sort of truck was it Mr Goose?

Cheers Scott
 

Craig Gillingham

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/04/2017
Was reading in the Weekly Times that the Victorian government has a fuel load map compiled last August on all of Victoria and will not publically release it because of some unknown reason. It seems to me that throwing resources at a fire after it has escaped is not solving the problem.
It was reported in The Age that the authorities didn't want fire-lighters to know where the greatest fire locations are.
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
Maxi's. Not really locking on a handbrake. Losing pressure simply locks on THE brakes.
Without knowing which truck burnt it's hard to tell what brakes it had on it. But to lock up because a hose melted.....sounds like maxi's. What sort of truck was it Mr Goose?

Cheers Scott
Yep, Maxi's ... we use the same term here. Properly call spring brakes, I believe. Or maybe spring applied secondary brakes.
I am too familiar with air brake systems ... just the words you guys were using confused me.
>>> Losing air pressure & locking on the hand brakes <<<
>>> heat had destroyed the hydraulic brake hoses and the brakes had locked on <<<

Most semi-truck / trailer combinations DO have a "handbrake" here. It applies the trailer brakes only. I've most commonly heard it called "the handvalve" It is NOT for parking.

Sure hope you guys get the fire thing under control ... & I would hope that someone catches one of the fire starter nitwits when no one else is around ! I think cauterizing hemorrhoids is a common legal medical procedure !

.
 

cobbadog

Registered
The newest issue is the paper masks offered as protection from asbestos and the the acrid smoke. Government at the moment don't appear to want to supply the best or even better masks to protect the firies.
Something that concerns me is who decides to send vehicles into such an unsafe area that the truck could be left crippled and put lives in danger?
 
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