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Thinning Enamel Paint

Jim M.

Registered
Gentlemen, How do you know when a paint is thin enough to use in a spray gun? I want to paint my restored Wisconsin engine with Valspar tractor and implement enamel with hardener from Farm & Fleet. Does this paint generally need to be thinned from the can? I have always used a spray can in the past but this engine is special to me. Thanks for any advice. Jim...
 

FarmSC

Subscriber
Age
48
Last Subscription Date
01/26/2020
Re: Thinning Enamel paint.

Gentlemen, How do you know when a paint is thin enough to use in a spray gun? I want to paint my restored Wisconsin engine with Valspar tractor and implement enamel with hardener from Farm & Fleet. Does this paint generally need to be thinned from the can? I have always used a spray can in the past but this engine is special to me. Thanks for any advice. Jim...
The paint can should tell you, but I always find that 4-2-1 paint,thinner, hardener works most of the time. I have an hvlp can over gun rig from NAPA, runs on about 18-20 lbs air.
Kevin
 

Preston Wells

Subscriber
Age
59
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
Farmer is right on the 4-2-1 mix and Ive had success mixing a little thinner at 3-2-1 but you need to take care not to over coat and create runs.
 

Dave R

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/31/2015
Re: Thinning Enamel paint.

I find that like water is too thin unless you spray very light coats.
 

John Hanson

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/05/2008
Every paint is manufactured a little different, so using the same ratio isn't always going to work. There are a bunch of other factors as well, but I don't want to get into all that.
Go to the manufacturer's tech sheets to get the proper mixing instructions and follow them to the letter! When I was handling the tech line for our paints, 99% of the time anyone had a problem, it was because they "already knew" all about mixing the paint and didn't follow the instructions. :rant:
If it's not mixed to the ratio that the mfg has tested, you're just setting yourself up for a problem.
John
 

Rod Fielder

Registered
Last Subscription Date
04/14/2016
the first thing you need is good paint. not valspar from tractor supply. it will dull out in the sun in 1 season. i have tried it several times. it was a great product 10 years ago when it had lead and chromium in it.
 

IronworkerFXR

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
09/06/2020
I use automotive paint such as PPG concept , pretty $$, and you should use their primers. Dupont, or Magnet paint Co has fleet finishes , Proper temp is important, no flame sources, and the hardners contain Isocyonates, good for durability bad for you,Think of cyanide. Use a respirator.
I also put a little flatting agent in the mix to take off the high gloss. If your staying with the valspar thin coats better let the first one really tack up to keep from running and it will take days to get hard , see if they have a Fast reducer , it tacks up faster and you really don't have large surface areas small equipment with a lot corners are always harder to paint, try painting some scrap first.
 

clappo

Registered
Hi I just place the pain in a plastic bowl for 1-2 minutes in the microwave (the one in the shed not inside) and spray it without any thinners easy to apply and less chance of runs.most old cars that were brush painted the paint tin sat in hot water for ease of applying the paint and less brush marks also works well on old engines if you don't want to spray them almost impossible to tell the difference and dries with a nice shine,cheers clappo
 
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