Unknown Hand Crank Metal Planer

Here is a picture of a neat little planer that I posted on Harry's back when I first got it... I have since then done a cosmetic restoration to the machine with making a few bolts and odds and ends. The maker of this planer is unknown ... It s a little crude but still well built... Some of the bolts are not standard such as 1/2-12 thread which could possibly date the machine in the 1800's well before the National Standard however it wasn't uncommon for a shop to use inventory that had been on the shelf for many years to just use what they had so its hard to get an accurate date on the build. If you look closely in the pictures you can see some pinstriping preserved on the machine... Although the color looks black the machine is actually a dark blue.. I'm not sure if its original or not but the paint still seems very old. This will be going in my small linshaft museum that I hope to complete in the coming year... I am planning on documenting the progress of the museum and will post more pics in the future.
 

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GameFarmOne

New member
George, I've looked the pictures over, and don't seem to see any pulley at all on the machine- do you mean that the blades are just hand-cranked?
If that's the case, bet the guys that worked in that shop were easy to spot...
had to be walking around town with one Popeye arm, and one regular sized!

gamefarmone
 

J.B. Castagnos

Active member
A friend has one very similar, he's 90 miles away, I'll try to get him to look at yours, possibly post a picture of his. When posting pictures I take them with my phone, email them to myself in the medium size, have no problems posting.
 
Gamefarmone,
No pulleys ... Everything is done by cranking with your arms..however there are no blades that you are cranking or spinning ... What you are actually doing is moving the table on the machine back and forth with the crank... The part you are machining is fixed to the table and there is a tool attatched to a "clapper box" which allows the machine to cut on the forward stroke and release on the back stroke ... With each cycle of the table the tool will index over and repeat the process ....very similar to a metal shaper... This was how most flat machined surfaces were done before the advent of the modern milling machines ... But you are correct, when using this all day you could definitely skip arm day at the gym.

j.B. Thanks I will try the method for the pictures next time ... I always want to load more pictures but loose the ambition when I have to do it one at a time.
 

Rustyjunque

New member
Hi - a friend of mine - J.B. - called me about your posting as I have a planer similar to yours. I got some info on mine from this book American Planer, Shaper, and Slotter Builders, 1830-1910 by Kenneth L Cope. Should be available on Amazon, but if not Astragal publishing has it. Hope this helps. Good luck!
 
Hi - a friend of mine - J.B. - called me about your posting as I have a planer similar to yours. I got some info on mine from this book American Planer, Shaper, and Slotter Builders, 1830-1910 by Kenneth L Cope. Should be available on Amazon, but if not Astragal publishing has it. Hope this helps. Good luck!
RustyJunque,
Thank you for the info... I actually do have that book...do you know what the make of your planer is? Is yours shown in that book? I have several different small planers listed in Copes book but this particular planer is not shown nor can I find any that resemble it.
 

Rustyjunque

New member
I don’t have the book in front of me but it’s a Baldwin - shown in the first few pages I think. I also ran across what I believe is an Enterprise table top shaper shown later in the book - have to check he page when I get home later - interesting story behind it, it was underwater in NO for about 9 weeks after Katrina and Rita.
 

GarysToys

New member
George

Have you ever completed your museum.

I live in Lancaster County and would like to see it when going through.

My dad was a machinist at the American Car and Foundry in Berwick from the late 1930's to the early 70's. He had to work using pre 1900 machines during
WW II until they got more modern machines to help in the war effort. Some of the stories he and my father told were unbelievable.
 
Hi Gary,
Still working on the little museum... I have some Amish builders lined up early summer to start construction of a post and beam building for the equipment.. I hope to get things moving soon..but as we know getting a full working line shaft shop is a significant project. I have been collecting many pieces over several years and I am still hunting more unique early machines. I anticipate getting it finished and inviting anyone and everyone to come and enjoy seeing it... I even plan on having a small one day event where friend collectors can set up an engine or machine to display for the day. I will be posting some pictures of the progress in the near future. George
 
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