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Unknown Lathe

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
I dont see a chuck. That looks almost identical to one my grandfather had except his was a bench top mount, should be a cover for the gears I would think. sorry cant help ID it, grandfathers i fear is long gone! A uncle got it and i have asked about it for years, I have the fealing he has traded it off!:rant:
 

Pete Spaco

Registered
I's say that you are missing the whole compound assembly, not just the tool holder.
Google "lathe compound" to see what I mean.

Is there any chance that you can go back where you bought it and look around for a box or pail of parts? Since the "badge" is gone, maybe the previous owner was in the process of tearing it down for a restore.

Makes me think of my own shop. I have a a couple of trip hammers that are partially apart for a "some day" restore. I even have a bunch of brand new parts for one of them, but those parts are in a different building. Will anybody ever find those parts at the "estate" sale?

Same for Cub Cadets, only worse!!!

Pete Stanaitis
---------------
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
"Will anybody ever find those parts at the "estate" sale?"
In my experience, maybe! I have seen this happen, the auction company either dont know or dont care! parts that belong to one thing will be sold off in a entirley different lot that has nothing to do with the machine.
 

gmciver

Registered
I do have buckets of parts, like you say it was tore down for a restore. The chuck, the compound slide (less the tool post) shields, tooling, and other stuff is in there. haven’t gotten a good chance to go through everything yet
 

Heller D. Davis

Subscriber
Age
84
I picked up a lathe that I don’t know anything about. I cant seem to read the logo.The only thing I seem to be missing for sure is the tool post, but possibly other things as well. any information would be appreciated.
Looks like it might be a Bradford. Google bradford vintage lathe and see what you get.
 
Your first action should be to join the Practical Machinist website. It's free and has hundreds of members, most of whom actually used these old machines in days gone by. A terrific source of vast, shared knowledge is available to you. Go to the "Antique" section of the website, post some good quality pictures and ask questions. You WILL get answers and help. Once you've posted your pictures and questions, ask if anyone has an identical lathe they're parting out. You might score a replacement slide rest!

Older lathes are a drudge on the market these days, so prices are low. Restoring old machine tools is inexpensive and results in a tool you can actually use.

Second action: DON'T sand blast it! I saw a beautiful old Lodge and Shipley on Epay that was absolutely ruined by some chowderhead who blasted everything (including the ways!) while it was still assembled. Result, sand in everything, including all the bearings and gears. To add insult to injury, he painted the whole thing (including the ways, again!) with blue porch paint. Some people shouldn't be allow to handle tools.........

I have an operational 1884 14" Putnam that is very similar in construction to the lathe in the post. By similar construction, I mean:

Lower spindle speed than modern lathes. The spindle bearings probably won't like more than 400 rpm or so, depending on the bearing material. Might be bronze...might be babbit. Remember, machining was a more "relaxed" job in those days, so expect to go slow and enjoy it!

The countershaft below the lathe can either be mounted on the ceiling or on a steel frame behind the machine. Be sure you can reach all the lube points and keep your first run up at a low speed to test the various controls. Remember, lots of oil and modest speeds always.

Speaking of oil....buy a gallon of 30 wt. HYDRAULIC oil for lube. This is the closest to the pure mineral oils that were used back then, with no additives. Do not use motor oil. Go on a "witch hunt" and find all the oil holes and squirt that hydraulic oil in until it's oozing out everywhere. Carefully turn anything with bearings by hand until you're sure it's oiled.

Lathes of this vintage did not always have a compound rest, as the idea was fairly new at that time. They were strictly "x-y" axis only. You are missing the entire top slide for the carriage, so without it you don't have a lathe. As suggested, go back to the original location and search around the building. If you see something that MIGHT belong to the lathe, grab it.....not only the top slide but any lathe centers or any other tooling that might be laying around. I didn't get any centers with my Putnam and will have to remove the tail stock spindle, take it to a shop and find out what the taper is, then have two centers made. Note that lathe builders of this era used "proprietary" tapers in their head stock and tail stock, so you can't just buy a set of Morse centers.

Good luck with your restoration and USE it!:D
 

gmciver

Registered
Thanks for the replies, I havent been able to definitively identify it yet, Ive had lots of suggestions and none of them the same. when I get a chance i'll have to get some more pictures more research and begin getting it to working condition.
 

Duey C

Subscriber
Age
56
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
g, that's a beautiful little lathe!
Not to be contrary: Early's didn't have much for guards around the gears, I believe.
The '11 SB 13X6 that lives here has one, around the outside of the gear train right next to the screw reversing handle. Yours doesn't even have that! Cool. Early.
Keep us posted. :)
 

QuickJ

Registered
Age
64
May be a Dalton. Have you gone to the "worlds largest machine tool archive" at www.lathes.co.uk/
and looked through the Dalton section to try to figure out a specific model?

Looking at the pictures of other Daltons will also give you an idea of what the guarding looked like, where the serial number info might be, etc.

The big square tailstock sure looks like Dalton.

Jim in Minnesota
 

gmciver

Registered
I have checked out "worlds largest machine tool archive", under the Dalton lathes it looks very similar to the one that's titled unrestored dalton
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Your lathe reminds me of an early (very early) Sebastian Lathe my dad had.
 

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