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Vintage Vibrator Type Inverter Power Supplies

KidDynamo

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2020
I have a number of these things in different input voltages: 6, 12 110, and either 24 or 32 (I forgot which) volts d.c. output is 110 volts a.c.

They are all made by A.T.R. company, i think. Ive had a little fun playing with them but all of mine are pretty low power rated.

I found the 110vdc to 110 a.c. one in a scrap pile by recognizing the distinctive company emblems and spec tags on it and once in a while I drag out a PE-77 WWII/ Korean war surplus 110vdc generator and run some a.c. stuff with it just because I can.

You can hear the vibrators hum. Not a real barn burner demonstration but a few folks take note.
 

len k

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/12/2018
Picked up an old 120V vac tube CB radio as a kid. Had a 12V vibrator inverter for car use. Didn't need 12V unit so eventually I trashed it and peeled vibrator can to see what was in side it. 4 large tungstan? contacts, pair on each side. Whole thing wrapped in foam to keep the noise down. Amazing the contacts didn't burn out sooner than they did, with the constant arc heating.
 

DKamp

Registered
The Johnson Messenger (which came in Business bands as well as CB and others) was available with an outboard power amplifier that provided a substantial amplification of output power by using high-level modulation of a pair of 6146B-class-equivalent tubes. The low level modulator ran same tubes I believe.

Rather than a mechanical vibrator, however, my unit (as well as similar power supplies for Heathkit tube rigs up through the late '70's) used a 'rexaxation oscillator) to alternately trigger transistors to the primary windings of a center-tapped step-up transformer... so same idea, but with solid-state germanium passing the current, rather than a mechanical oscillator.

73! KW0D :wave:
 
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