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Waukesha powered FC-182? 8kw 1200 rpm unit Fleabay

nblack

Registered
just stumbled across this.
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5335872123&icep_item=324086098938
(hope the link works) To those of us, Keith, Dave, myself, (just to name a few) THESE are the mother lode. Opening bid is $500, i think? This looks like a beautiful unit. can confidently be willed to your great-great grandkids. These 1200 rpm units don't scream, or even drone. They just politely sit in the corner, and 'burble'. If I can be of assistance in moving this, please keep me posted.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
He’s got a short video of the engine running too. Says he didn’t test the generator for output.

"
 

Zephyr7

Registered
If only it was a diesel, I’d be going down to the turnpike tomorrow... I’d get to test out my EZ pass that hasn’t been through a toll stop since last spring...

Bill
 

nblack

Registered
If it was a diesel, I wouldn't have posted it, until it was in my barn....STILL though, the wookie gassers are formidable. Will have to post pics of my recent (kinda) trip to the NE quadrant of the country. Drug back a unit very similar to this, and two other Wookie powered units. One is a 6cyl, and the other one is an unknown 4cy, with a BIG (1200rpm) gen head on it. :brows:
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Well, that thing is pretty much the holy grail for me. Maybe someday...

Keith
 

K-Tron

Registered
How much fuel can you expect this unit to burn per hour at 25% load, 50% load or 100% load?
How about the generator head, is it a good robust unit as you would come to expect a 1200rpm generator head to be? Does Kohler support these at all, or is there a go to place for generator parts for these?
I ask since my brother is looking for a generator with single phase 230VAC capacity high enough to run his 4500 watt electric hot water heater.

Chris
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I’ve never seen the fuel consumption published. I have heard that they’re not too bad, presumably since they’re so nice and slow. Milling the head will no doubt help.

The generator is inherently regulated. It is designed such that, as load is increased, exciter voltage also increases. Like a compound wound dc machine, but ac. No electronics are required, not even rectifiers.

I would say it is phenomenally robust. This set will weigh in just shy of 2000 lbs. About 1950 IIRC.

These are from the ‘40’s and the modern day Kohler Company is likely worthless as regards support.

Keith
 

K-Tron

Registered
I found a document on the Waukesha FC engines. At 1200rpm, the chart suggests a 0.58 lb/hp-hour fuel consumption rate. Making 20 hp at that rpm would give a theoretical maximum fuel load of 11.6lbs/hour, or 1.4 gallon per hour. If that is the maximum, than it would probably be safe to say that it will burn around 3/4 to 1 gallon per hour at 50% load, maybe 1 to 1-1/4 gallon per hour at 75% load. Not terrible, but a little higher than I thought it would be running at just 1200rpm. The FC engine is listed around 300lbs, does that generator head, skid and radiator really add another 1700lbs? Not having seen one in person, I was guessing around 1000-1250lbs for everything. My one cylinder GM with 10kw 1200rpm Delco generator is right around 2000lbs, and it at least appears to have a lot more iron in it. I was reading online a little about how battery voltage is critical to have right around the specified voltage as it impacts the excitation of the generator. The way you describe it makes more sense. I am going to ask the seller for some pictures of the brush end of the generator. If all it needs is a good cleaning and some oxidation remediation on connections, this looks like it might be a good generator. I also want to hear about the running oil pressure of the engine. I saw smallenginemechanicMike's video on youtube of his with the spun main bearings, I do not need another big project! A nice easy one would be nice every now and then!

https://www.wehs.net/bulletins/bul_846-J_FCS_FC_04-37-r.pdf

Chris
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Also realize that, while the engine is rated at 20 hp, the generator won't take nearly that much at full load. Lot's reserve power available there. So maybe 3/4 ~ 1 gph at full electrical load. Give or take.

I looked though the manual that I have digitized, and did not see the specs for the set. I know I've seen it somewhere though. The smaller 5 kva, with the smaller Waukesha, was around 1750, these ones 1950. It's a big generator, and has a separate exciter as part of it's design. And it's very conservative in design too. If it says 10 kva on the nameplate, they mean 10 kva for as long as you can feed it fuel and keep the oil up. ;)

Keith
 

Zephyr7

Registered
When/if a 1200 RPM diesel set shows up at a comparable price on this board, every member within 300 miles will be going for it.
Yeah, but I would drive faster ;)

Kohler can be surprisingly helpful with these old units IF you find the right people to talk to. The actually have all the old drawings at the factory! I asked once how the auto start sets of old (the ones that start when they sense load) worked, and the Kohler rep sent me original drawings when he got back to the factory. It helps that I do a lot of commercial buisness with them.

I did tell the Kohler guys about this site and suggested that they could win a lot of brand loyalty by participating a bit with drawings and the like, but I don’t think they have the time to do it much.

Bill
 

jack0

Registered
Age
60
These units are quite heavy. The cast base must be at least 150#. The engine adapter and bell end are 1" and most likely also the housing.
Some nice features are. A big oiled rear bearing, heavy insulated wiring, spring tension adjustments on the brushes, 2 brushes per ring,

All the brushes are attached to the bolts running through the end. The bolts are run through insulated gromets .
Hopefully the guy still has the aluminum covers that go on it.

I have the 5 kva unit and fuel consumption isn't that bad. Ran it a few weeks ago. Measured 1/2 gal-43 minutes @ 2800w. Started with a dry fuel bowl. Next time I'll see what the no load consumption is.

Hopefully a stacker will end up getting this one.
 

nblack

Registered
Couple of thoughts. First. Kohler rated their units with Natural Gas. THEREFORE: They will produce more KW with LP and gasoline... And they will do it 24/7. Second. While support of these beautiful, archaic, 'legacy' units is not really supported, They were freakin' overbuilt in the first place, and with simple maintenance, (i.e. brushes, Mag parts, carb parts, etc. ) will EASILY fulfill my previous posts' claim. These units embody an earlier time in our nation, when pride existed in manufacturers, and the EXPECTED lifespan of a capital investment REQUIRED simple service, and locally available parts, or substitution, for continued performance. For decades. Try this 'periscope' with respect to ANY (and I do mean ANY) manufacturer of today, or even the last 15-20 years? (looking for step down from soap box........) Efficiency is NOT measured in FUEL/hr. It is measured in TIME/ability to keep operational/decade. If your purchase does not make the decade mark, it DOES NOT even qualify for consideration. There is a reason that old stuff gets fixed/ rebuilt and used.
I too, hope a 'Staker gets it. ;)
 
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K-Tron

Registered
I was really surprised that nobody else bid on this generator. 13 watchers and nearly 450 views. I thought the owner was quite responsive and honest from her responses on ebay. The engine runs with 45psi of oil pressure, and the pictures she sent to me of the slip rings and commutator looked good. She is including the four rear honeycomb generator brush covers and a propane regulator setup for the engine. Although the batteries are not included, I thought it was too good of a deal to pass up. Now to find a service manual for it. Anyone out in engine land have one??? I am hoping that this is a simple project, I sure as hell do not need any more ten year projects! My plans are to check valve lash, clean the oil pan and oil pickup, pull the brushes, clean the commutator and slip rings, and do a few hours of oxidation remediation, and then crank it up and see what she does. If anyone can furnish an operators manual or service manual for one of these I would greatly appreciate it.

Chris
 

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Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I believe that I have digitized the manual for this plant. I don’t know if we can send emails any longer? Send me a PM with your email address.

Congratulations! And thank you. I would have loved to have this, but it is about as far away as possible, and I am out of space, health problems, etc.

Keith
 

Bent Trigger

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/03/2019
Good Job Chris, and not too bad of a distance for pick up. Seems like a very solid unit. Good Luck!! Chris
 

nblack

Registered
I am so glad that you got this unit. I told the wife repeatedly,"is it OK if I bid on this?" she said "yes" but I still waited. Glad I did. Congrats, and best of luck. Clean the brush holders, slap a magnet on the side of the exciter, and put a good load on it. Didn't notice if the rectifiers were Selenium or not. If so, swap the suckers out to Silicon, and party on!. Please keep us all jealously posted.....😄
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Hey Chris,

The manual has been sent. It applies entirely to your plant with the exception of the fact that yours is an Emergency Plant, so there will be differences in the controller. I'll have to see what I have digitized as regards the Emergency Controllers. The gist of them is that they have a built in transfer switch. Many of the elements should be the same or similar to the Remote Control plants. There's also a time delay relay and a trickle charger, in addition to the transfer switch itself.

The Selenium rectifier that you find is only for the battery tender. If you replace it with a silicon one, you'll need to account for the lack of voltage drop, or you'll over charge your battery. This difference might work out if you use a 36 volt battery (3 12s) instead of the original 32 volt. If the rectifier fails open, the battery just won't be charged, no harm done. If it fails shorted, it's transformer would be ruined. Adding an appropriate fuse would probably be a good idea. It's not critical like it is in the later sets with transformer compounding.

If you start the plant electrically, there's no concern over residual magnetism as the exciter also functions as the cranking motor. If you hand start the plant, it may or may not build up. Once you've started it electrically once, it should build up on it's own when hand started after that. Manual plants have a button that shunts the field regulating resistance, to facilitate building up, in the event it doesn't on it's own. If you'll be using it manually, I'd consider adding this feature.

Keith
 
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dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Chris- Congratulations, I'm certain that once you start working on it, any concerns you have about getting 'support' will be rapidly melted away.

These things are INHERENTLY supported... meaning, they're
1) incredibly obvious for all critical aspects
2) incredibly robust in design AND manufacture
3) incredibly clever with respect to design- the technology was heavily vested in simplifying, rather than complicating the machine
4) SO DANGED EASY to work on...
5) Basically... NOTHING is irreplaceable.

Fuel consumption... back when I got my first one, it was a 12.5R something in 230v delta. i had a bunch of transformers rigged to it to yield 240 single, which wasn't all that efficient I'm certain... but it kept my house warm through a 3-day ice storm on 6-gallon cans, and I think it came to something like 62 hours and only 45 gallons used. That being said, I was running the house, which included a gas furnace, well pump, incandescent lights, TV, microwave oven, sump pumps... not a 'precision test load'. 3/4 gal/hr on gasoline under that load is a fair ballpark, but there's lots of variables. Suffice to say, they're not incredibly thirsty.

Yours doesn't look like it needs too much work. If the engine runs, and there's nothing really burned up inside, it'll only take you a few hours to wake it up. Keep us posted, we'll walk 'ya through whatever you need. It's an old, but simple industrial engine, and a really, really well built generator head, integrated into a very robust unit, and YES, they're HEAVY. If you go through hurricanes or tornados, put ratchet straps from the base to your rafters... if the nails are strong enough, you might not have walls, but the roof, and the concrete slab under the generator, will still be there...
 
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