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Wayne/WestingHouse Air Compressor

s100

Registered
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

In all probability the oil sensor wants to be connected in series with the power going to the pull in coil on the magnetic starter. So your series connection to the pull in will be as follows, the switch in the pressure switch, the oil sensor and the coil. When pressure is low the pressure switch is closed and the pull in engages the contactor. When pressure builds to the limit level the pressure switch opens, removing power from the pull in and the motor stops. And if the oil sensor is unhappy it opens and nothing else can get the motor to start. But if te oil sensor is not connected, make sure it works before going through all the monkey motion of hooking it up. At a low oil condition there should be no continuity between the two wires. If the oil is full the two wires should be a dead short to each other.

If you don't have a magnetic starter and are using a pressure switch with the contactor built in, I don't think you can use the oil sensor, unless you have another contactor in line before the pressure switch, which makes no sense. But then people do things that make no sense all the time so who knows.

Good luck.
 

Barnbikes

Registered
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

Wires are just hanging from the oil sensor.

Took the drain off of it last night and the bottom of the tank is full of tar like dried out oil. Was thinking of pouring so degreaser in it but am afraid it might be plugging some pin holes.

Other side.
 

Attachments

s100

Registered
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

If your tank has pinholes better you find out now rather than later, with an accompanying demonstration of kinetic energy. I always liked finding old tanks with a coating of oil in the bottom. The oil protects the steel from any water accumulation.I'm not sure if this holds true for dried out gunk though, and the presence of oil or gunk is by no means a certain indicator of tank condition. Better to check the tank over carefully before pressurizing it.
 

Andy Williams

Registered
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

the tank is probably ok but check and see. i got one form my uncle that had the tank half full of water, that's why it was so heavy. he never drained it in 20+ years. i washed it out and it looked good inside. the one you have probably came from a gas station they sold wayne gas pumps. the one i got is a gilbarco, gilbert barker co. (really a quincy) from a gas station too.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

I ALWAYS hydro-test any air tank I get before using it. If even a modest sized tank fails at pressure it can quite easily be a life changing event. Google air tank explosion or air compressor explosion. LOTS of good photos and stories on there. BOOM! :brows:
 
G

Gary Barber

Guest
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

If you don't have a magnetic starter and are using a pressure switch with the contactor built in, I don't think you can use the oil sensor, unless you have another contactor in line before the pressure switch, which makes no sense. But then people do things that make no sense all the time so who knows.
Well maybe this will make sense The contacts in the low oil sensor can not handle the large amperage load required for the motor and would burn out almost instantly Does that make sense ???
 

beezerbill

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/10/2019
Re: Wayne/WestingHouse air compressor

Yes, hydrotesting an air receiver with unknown history is a good idea. I have had a few fail the test, usually making a little "pink" noise when the tank fails and water squirts out of a little pinhole that breaks through. The last one I tested failed right at about 110 psi, about 10 pounds below where I was going to set the compressor cut-off.

Another check which I would like to start doing is to examine the inside of the receiver with a borescope (after washing all the goo out of the receiver) but I haven't obtained a good borescope yet.

Sometimes a receivers fail with a little air squirting out of a pinhole, giving a nice audio alarm that something is wrong. But other times they can burst outright. I've never actually seen one fail but I have seen plenty of examples of the results. Not pretty.
 
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