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What Did You Make This Week?

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Joel, this week I cobbed together an extension and awning to my 12’ x 12’ blacksmith shed.
I only used recycled materials, not counting fasteners. Not only did I “shelter in place”, I didn’t spend any money.
The post holding up the extension will be this long-ago modified Ford Model TT rear axle torque tube. I will be setting the bottom end in the ground about three feet and using cement. The Model T roof brace goes right along with my Model T frame workbench I made two years ago.
I’m using as much extra iron from my various old truck projects as I can to save money and add visual impact.
Surely, this is in keeping with the blacksmith spirit?
 

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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Duey, the Model T frame is perfect to make a bench out of. It’s flat except the ends. No way it will ever sag or be overloaded. Since it’s metal you can use self drilling fasteners to add legs and table.
I had some equally old redwood 4 x 4s I used for legs and bought some DF 2 x 6s for the table. I then whitewashed to try to fake people that the entire thing was old.
thanks, again!
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
When you are working with old stuff even little victories are huge.
First, you have to know what it is you are looking for, (post vise) then you have to find it, negotiate for it, afford to buy it, buy it, get it loaded, bring it home, unload it, decide where it will go (in my case build a shop), find some heavy wall square steel tube that would fit inside the well casing welded to the vise, dig the hole for the tube, measure for height, adjust the tube to vertical, cement in the tube and then slide the heavy vise over the tube.
Whew!
Even such a tiny detail takes hours and hours of accumulated time. Thinking and research even more time than that.
I tripped over that darned vice for a year before I planted it.
It’s not much Joel, but that’s all I got accomplished.
 

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bartlett0815

Registered
It wasn't just this week, but the past few weeks I've been working on this project... casting and finishing a brass butt plate for a Snider-Enfield cavalry carbine made in 1870. Each was hand fitted to the particular gun so buying one that fits, either a repro or an original off Ebay is a crapshoot. Rather than posting the whole thing here, I'll post the link to the British Militaria Forum, if that is allowed.
Kevin in NC
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/bri...utt-plate-part-3-machining-grindi-t26189.html
 

Oldtech

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Well thread says what did you make this week? This week I machined the sleeve (Top) to go in this bearing because you cant seem to get a 30 x 80 mm bearing anymore. Inside is 35. Used a piece of an old hydraulic ram, made it on the home built lathe my dad built in the 1930's. Still powered by a Maxwell starter. It's a little slow, but we did it. Fit perfectly.
 

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Oldtech

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Here' some pictures of the little lathe: Top one the Simms-Huff ( Maxwell starter) power
Second: Revolution counter made from old odometer. He used to use it to wind coils for motors
Third: The lathe. Made during the 30's out of parts and pieces of whatever. Main base is a tractor valve cover, sewing machine baseplate for headstock base. Disc spindles for supports, a timing gear - possibly Maxwell for a belt pulley. The chuck is the only bought part.
A chain from the sprocket at bottom left to the headstock allows cutting threads right or left depending how you shift the gears.
the rest is iron stock bolted together- no welder yet. A lot of threaded holes.
It's not a production unit, but kinda fun to do small jobs.20200519_213319.jpg20200519_213252.jpg

20200519_213222.jpg
 
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Odin

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Was a couple weeks ago, but I made a Trammel out of some 1/4" x 1" and 1/4" x 1/2" 1018 bar stock I had. Was trying to get the holes a nice even 2" apart, but I can see at least one of them I was off-center when punching. And yes, I punched them square. Just because I could. I usually punch things square then drift it round if it has to be round.
 

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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Haven’t heard from Joel since the virus crap stuff began...
are you OK, Joel?
hopefully just busy making wonderful things...
 
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