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What Have You Done to Your Onan Generator Today?

quabillion

Registered
Last Subscription Date
05/12/2016
I used the NGK BPR6HIX plugs, they came with the cardboard tubes protecting the gap so I did not gap them. Sorry that I didnt think to check them. Kinda figured I would try them as is and then move on to gapping if needed but it was not needed. Runs smooth as glass now.
 

Ray Lynch

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
08/12/2019
I switched to the NGK recently. The come out of the box at .030. Started set up and at no load no miss. At half load, no miss. (Approx 1 hour run). Removed load and started to miss but not as frequently as with previous Autolite plugs. Believe Brae set his gap to .028. Gonna try that next time I run set.
Ray
7.5 JB propane
 

Zephyr7

Registered
The little flicker you see on generator power is usually one of four things:
1- reactive loads (uncorrected capacitor input DC power supplies) causing voltage waveform distortion. This is most common with small generators, which means usually 5-10kw or less.
2- voltage regulator issues (which can often be made worse by #1) causing variations in the output voltage
3- small variations in rotational speed caused by the governor (common in smaller generators and very lightly loaded larger ones)
4- small variations in rotational speed caused by the non-linear rotational torque produced by reciprocating engines. This is most common with engines with a small number of cylinders since more cylinders means a more linear torque output.

1, 2 and 3 are most common. 4 is unusual and you’d have to look pretty close. I see #3 on my 20RZ sometimes, but it goes away if I add more load (my average load is around 10% or so of capacity). 1 is usually only correctable by using a larger generator since it’s dependent on the resistance of the windings. 2 can sometimes be adjusted away, but other times indicates a problem with the AVR.

Bill
 

HBSaunders

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Hooked up the 5.0 CCK to propane tank. Took some juggling on the lines but it cranked up and ran smooth as silk. Felt good about the 150.00 I paid for it. Got another one just like it in really good shape low hours I'm going to try to duplicate the regulators and lines. Hopefully I won't take a trip to the moon hooking up propane to it.
 

Kevin K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
small variations in rotational speed caused by the non-linear rotational torque produced by reciprocating engines. This is most common with engines with a small number of cylinders since more cylinders means a more linear torque output.
This is very common on Onan 1800RPM single cylinder generators, such as 2.5LK and 3.0DJA.
 

Onan Dan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/28/2020
I switched to the NGK recently. The come out of the box at .030. Started set up and at no load no miss. At half load, no miss. (Approx 1 hour run). Removed load and started to miss but not as frequently as with previous Autolite plugs. Believe Brae set his gap to .028. Gonna try that next time I run set.
Ray
7.5 JB propane
Ray on my JB 7.5 on propane the spark plugs NGK B-6L i have them set at .025" at .018" it had a miss at no load once i opened the plug gap there is no miss at load or no load hope this helps.
 

Ray Lynch

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
08/12/2019
Ray on my JB 7.5 on propane the spark plugs NGK B-6L i have them set at .025" at .018" it had a miss at no load once i opened the plug gap there is no miss at load or no load hope this helps.
Dan
I will give that a shot next time I run.
Thanks
Ray
 

turtmaster

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/03/2019
The little flicker you see on generator power is usually one of four things:
"Snip"
Bill
Another thing I've noticed that sometimes causes flickering, poorly designed, triac "power controllers"

I have a heat gun from Harbor Freight, their "digital one" with LED light settings, and when plugged into the workbench Outlets, that have the fluorescent light ls above it, connected to the same circuit, and by the way these are good Advance brand ballasts higher-end commercial ones, for 4 F32 T8 lamps, these particular ballasts are about a foot long, anyways the heat gun will make those lights flicker noticeably depending turn on the heat setting, especially at the lower heat range.
And mind you this is on utility power!
 

Zephyr7

Registered
Slip knot, thyristor power controllers work by controlling where along the sine wave the controlled device turns on. This is done every half cycle. The resulting near instantaneous current pulses created by the thyristor getting triggered “on” cause waveform distortion and harmonic currents. This is especially noticeable on relatively high impedance power sources like generators, but can be seen on utility power too.

I actually managed to blink my neighbors houses once years ago with a phase controlled transformer walk-in circuit I designed. I made a software error in the controller (didn’t allow for inductance basically, which resulted in somewhat less controllable thyristor triggering). The result was my circuit was triggering every other half cycle or so, and when I was testing the circuit on my 7.5kva test transformer, the current pulses were enough to pulse the porch lights of the three other houses sharing the utility transformer feeding my house at the time. I was amazed how much of an effect it had since the thyristor device was really small, but the instantaneous current pulses were VERY large. I never bothered to setup my scope to actually measure the current pulses after I figured out what was going on and fixed the software.

Bill
 
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len k

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/12/2018
Ran my Onan 7NHM today. Last run in fall.
Not installed yet, still sitting on cement block table out back. Still using a 3/4 gal snow blower gas tank for now.......testing. Hopefully this summer I'll get around to modifying old 100# propane tank into a horizontal gas tank, it'll go under gen, between cement blocks. About 24 gal size will let me ignore gas for about a day during an outage.

Tried to start it, nothing doing. Looked in gas tank and it was empty. Thought tank had some gas in it last fall, must have dried up ??? Gas did have a HEAVY dose of stabilizer, so I just refilled tank and ran it. I drizzled gas down carb throat with squirt bottle till fuel got to carb and it ran on it's own. Let it run while I went for a walk.

I'm in a quite area, about 300 ft away I could just only mildly hear it above background noise, if I listened for it. Not like that box store screamer neighbor ~ 300 ft away used all day and night for a week during a snow storm outage. Hopefully that noisemaker was rented:rant::rant::rant::headbang: Had to have extra beer just to get to sleep , even though there was a large house between it and my bedroom.
 
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len k

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/12/2018
Internal muffler in my Onan 7NHM is pretty quite. When I get gen set up I'll add 2nd external muffler to quite it down more.

I'll also make up a box for gen. Seems there is a lot of other mechanical noise coming off genset itself too.

I'm a light sleeper
 

HBSaunders

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Working on setting up another demand regulator and shut off solenoid with a quick disconnect to hook to another 100# cylinder.propane company's don't return calls so I'm on a learning curve. They will sell or rather rent a tank and get vague on hooking up a genset to it. Guess it's just too big a risk. Copied the other setup with a few changes. Using Mr. heater regulators from POL that are supposed to get it down to 11 " wc. That seems to be the magic number. Not sure how many btu's a 5.0 CCK uses. These regulators say they go up to225000 btu. Read somewhere else a 10 kw genset needed 175000.
 
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