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WHAT IS A DYNAMO?

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SONNY

Guest
HI AND THANKS WHAT IS A DYNAMO AND WHAT DOES IT DO I JUST DONT KNOW SONNY THANKS
 
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Craig Anderson

Guest
Besides a 2 year old on steroids a dynamo is a generator, especially when referring to DC current. Just that simple. Craig
 
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Andrew Mackey

Guest
A dynamo is a generater with permanant magnets, and no form of regulater. They usually have no feold windings, depending soley on the strength of the magnets for current and voltage. Common uses for dynamos were for early igniter fired engines, being driven off the flywheel face. Some had a governor on the end of the drive, so the dynamo would not be over sped. Common names - Motsinger auto sparker, Century, and others. Andrew
 
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Russ Hughes

Guest
The term "dynamo" is an old term for a generator. It may have permanent magnet fields, as in old engine ignition practice, or it may have a wound field so it's output may be regulated. And yes, it could also be an energetic little person who never seems to run down.
 
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Dave Showerman

Guest
Sonny, I think it would be fair to call a DYNAMO a mechanical battery replacer. Back when a dead dry cell battery might mean a trip to town with the horse and buggy/wagon or auto, It was nice to have a means of making your own power. Dave in Holt.
 
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Phillip

Guest
Well from what I can remember of tradeschool,a DYNAMO uses permanant magnets and produces AC,they are the type you had on your push bike the faster you peddle the brighter your lights. A generator uses a wound field coil or coils and produces DC,it also has no inherant regulation,the faster you drive it the more it produces.The strange thing is the armature terminal on most GENERATORS is called the Dynamo terminal,and on some alternators the indicator/light terminal is marked as Dynamo positive.So does that make things clearer
 
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Kid Dynamo

Guest
I have a machine that weighs in at about 200 lbs and it is a Hanson and Van Winkle Dynamo. It has a nice brass tag that says that on it. It has large, wound field coils and no permanent magnets. Shortly after I bought it, I found this website and adopted my "nickname" as was very common then.

Looking up the words generator, dynamo, and magneto in the dictionary indicates that these words have overlapping uses. The British manuals I have read may have different uses of these same words, as do various other texts.

I have concluded that the word dynamo is not distinct by itself and can't stand alone. Example: I would describe my Hanson and Van Winkle unit as a low voltage, d.c., wound field coil, very heavy dynamo. Still, some confusion would remain, but why call it anything but a dynamo? It says dynamo right on it!

A fellow enthusiast replied to my early queery about my biggish dynamo saying that he had worked with these very units while he was an electricians apprentice. He encountered them in plating shops and his job was to dress the armature commutators. Following his lead, I looked in an old 1930 Audel's Electrical text and there was a "picture" of a plating shop with "Hanson and Van Winkle" dynamos supplying power.
 
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SONNY

Guest
DYNAMO IN QUESTION

HI VERNON WAS HELPFUL AND POSTED A PIC OF MY ITEM IN ? go to generators that is where he has posted it for help thanks sonny
 
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David Greenwalt

Guest
Just out of curiosity I looked up dynamo in my 1927 dictionary. I like to do this on occasion because its kind of neat to see how they described things in the era that they used them the most. It describes a dynamo as a machine to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Then I looked up generator. It said to refer to dynamo. In my modern dictionary it describes dynamo as an old name for generator, and a generator as a machine to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. If anybody is interested in how the terms we use today were used back in the era that our old iron was used daily, just let me know and I'll look it up. This dictionary is about 6 inches thick and has over 2500 pages, some really neat stuff in it. David.
 
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John Davidson

Guest
I have a dynamo that has a plate that reads 'FAIRBANKS MORSE DIRECT CURRENT DYNAMO' 3/4 KW 32 Volts weighs over 150 lbs and is over 90 years old. Looks like a AC motor with cast iron ends-no magnets. So the name, dynamo does not have to have permanent magnets it seems.
 
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Bob (ND)

Guest
I have bopped around to some various referance and technical sites on the 'NET, and there is pretty much of a consensus that "dynamo" refers to a direct current generator that may have either permanent magnet, or wound fields.

The term "alternator" refers to AC generators.

Of course, many dynamos for use with these old engine ignition systems are permanent magnet units, so it is easy to get that though lodged in our heads.
 
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Andrew Mackey

Guest
Dynamos permanant magnets are not always the common horseshoe type. I had a Kurz & Root unit that had the permanant magnets de-magnetized in a junk yard. The yard personell had lifted the unit onto a scrap iron heap with a 600 VAC lifting magnet. It took repeated flashing of the fields to restore the magnetism. Flashing the fields imparts a magnetic field into the shoes of the poles around the exterior of the armature (in pairs of 2). This magnetism, usually in a weak state usually remains after the unit stops making power. It can be lost either by a long perion of non-use, reversal of battery connections - during feild flash, and by exposure to an AC magnetic source - a test 'growler' or in my case, a junkyard lift magnet.
 
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Ralph Leonard

Guest
A very interesting thread. Prompted me to hunt up my grade school text book written by J.S. Zerbe, M.E. and published in 1914. It says a loop of wire revolving in a magnetic field and producing a electric current is called a dynamo. It says "the natural current generated by a dynamo is alternating in its character".

It is descibed as a alternating current dynamo if used as is, and a direct current dynamo if a circuit reversing mechanism, "commutator", is used.

Another reference book said in early years they were called dynamo electric generators. Later years shortened to dynamos and now just generators. Go to Lowes and ask for a dynamo, the answer might be, "I'm sorry sir, we're all out"

Ralph in NC
 

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