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What is the best type of welding for this repair?

G.M.Johnson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/05/8018
Charley K, If I rember correctly I started a thread here on the Stake about some testing I did with welding cast Iron using mig wire. I will see if I can find it Yep, some of the best welds I did on cast where done with mig wire. I have a good friend that does tractor pulling and we welded up a cracked block and a axel housing. They both are still holding strong.
 

Dave Myers

Registered
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
12/07/2018
Another thought. After seeing a video of Branson Lund trying out Muggy Weld I decided to give it a shot on an old Fairbanks starting air compressor that had freeze cracks on the water jacket. You need a fairly stable welder with fine adjustment in the lower ranges (50-60 amps). It is AC or DC but I haven't tried AC yet. You weld the part cold (70F ) and do an inch at a time peening immediately. Never let the part get hot. This is the nicest welding rod I have ever used of any sort. Disclaimer: I'm not a pro by any stretch. Not cheap rod but IMHO well worth every penny. No idea on the wear properties of this. Can't remember if I ordered direct or through Amazon.
David
 

Langes Machine Shop

Registered
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2016
First I must thank everyone for their replies. I thought about making a larger diameter roller and just clean up the lip all the way around the cam and that should be fine. Then a reply from another Forum bought it to my attention that by doing that repair it would alter the profile of the cam and not give the correct lift and duration and the more I looked at the damage and shape I tend to agree, so back to building this up.
With no oxy to use at hand and only a rather large LPG burner as a heat source I think that the cast iron rods may be the way to go. Living in Rural NSW there is no one around with the fancy spray welding equipment locally so sending it off would be the only way that could be done.
Machinig down or off the existing cam is a possiblity and then making another and getting to be exactly in the correct timing position would be out of my ability.
As this is early days for the rebuilding of the engine I am happy that I found this issue so early in the rebuild. This allows me to ask for opinions and then weigh up what I can or cannot do, can I do it or have to send it off or find someone local. If the larger roller was the answer I have the steel and the lathe to do so but the thoughts that it would not be right has put me off that route. I wonder how many more times I will change my mind on this repair, I think I'm at 4 now.
Please don't be offended if I choose to not use your suggestion/s but I have and will take all the ideas onboard, thank you.
Don't put cast rods like nickel or steel in there. Send it off to someone that can build it up for you and not screw it up. Put that other stuff in there and it fails now what have you got.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Again a big thanks to all the replies and by people with far more expeience that I on this topic. Would love to braze it up but no oxy to do so and no TIG attachment for my welders that have that ability. This leaves me with arc or MIG. I have been looking at Ni 99% rods just not sure what quantity would be needed or if 2.5mm or 3.2mm os best diameter for this exercise.
Already have a profile of the cam to duplicate the final shape so that is a bonus. As I may have mentioned I have been going back and forth on which way I am most comfortable to go with this repair. Not having any repair shops that do cams or speciality engineering work other than a basic engine reconditioner that can bore an engine and machine a head so that option is out to. This is the hard part of living in rural areas you dont have everything at your finger tips and you have make do with what you can get.
 

Langes Machine Shop

Registered
Last Subscription Date
10/12/2016
Hi mate, can you explain the reasons why you mention this as I am confused as to why not to use Ni99% rods on cast.
That rod does not do a good job on cast iron, just as bad is steel. Brazing it with bronze or cast iron is best or using a spray torch. You want something that is going to stay on there and not just lay there and fall off or gets so hard that you can't machine it. You should find someone that can do it and ship it to them. You will be time and money ahead and have a better job. I have fixed way to many parts that have been screwed up by Ni99% rods and steel.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Thanks for the explanation, I get confused when offered some advise with no explanation. Now I know it helps me with the direction I need to go.
As I am not a welder I was looking at rods that were recomended to use for welding cast and the most common answer was to use Ni rods and is the only reason I was looking at them.
I will let you know how I get on during the week.
Cheers Cobba
 

The Stick Man

Registered
Thanks for the explanation, I get confused when offered some advise with no explanation. Now I know it helps me with the direction I need to go.
As I am not a welder I was looking at rods that were recomended to use for welding cast and the most common answer was to use Ni rods and is the only reason I was looking at them.
I will let you know how I get on during the week.
Cheers Cobba
I agree. Pay a lot of money once. A1 Metallising Services Sydney. If you want me to hand deliver it for you I will.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Well its in the hand of a professional welder who is confident of a perfect repair, just left it with him for a while until its my turn. This gives me time to get on with other parts of the restoration.
 

cobbadog

Registered
So am I and now I am getting anxious and want it back to keep the restoration moving forward as re-assembly started today along with some great news that a hard to find part has turned up to be available and it will be on its way to me in a week or so. Still finding small fiddly jobs but easy to fix stuff so I am doing something with it but I want it to go ahead faster.
 

The Stick Man

Registered
So am I and now I am getting anxious and want it back to keep the restoration moving forward as re-assembly started today along with some great news that a hard to find part has turned up to be available and it will be on its way to me in a week or so. Still finding small fiddly jobs but easy to fix stuff so I am doing something with it but I want it to go ahead faster.
You’re on a roll obviously. Perhaps it’s time to review something already done which quite wasn’t what you expected in the outcome. Downtime is review time I tell my crew or as the fun sheriff tells me, if you got time to lean, it’s time to clean.
 

cobbadog

Registered
I'm still moving forward with it doing some of those silly little repairs that take time like the cooling tubes that run into the head. The originals were all over the place so knocked them all out and fitted new copper tube.
 
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