• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When registering, please provide your CITY and STATE as your location!

where to begin collecting?

oncewaslost1982

Registered
Hey everyone.After playing with the maytag and getting it to work, and getting my first issue of GEM in the mail and reading around on here I am wanting to get my first full size hit and miss engine to work on. I find the flywheel engines fascinating and would like to have some advice on what to start out with and where to look. I am on a tight budget so i know that I cannot afford anything like a Fairbanks morse or any of the other higher end engines. Just something good for a beginner and then as money and time allow work my way up the chain. I was thinking it might be best to get something that already runs, or will nor take much to run and is complete to start out with that way I can take it apart, do some cleaning and get it back together and up again. What do you all think? Thanks for any advice. This is a great forum.


Justin
 

oncewaslost1982

Registered
Oh, what price range am I going to be looking at when searching for a starter engine? 500 is probably all I will be able to come up with for a long time. That may even be pushing it a lot. ??
 

Jordan

Registered
Justin,

the hercules line of engines are a excellent choice for a first engine. another excellent choice would be a stover k series engine as that was my first. but you should do some looking aroound and by an engine that appeals to you. also make sure any engine that you are looking at is all there (no parts missing).if the magneto is missing that is a $200.00+ dollar part to buy. another plus would be that it is running but if you want the challenge if turning a non-runner into a runner by all means go for it. deals are out there still to be had on engines. so ask questions and who knows you might find a few engines that could be had few $500 or less.and if you ever need help with an engine don't hesitate to ask the fine gentlemen on smokstak will be able to help you out.

Jordan

p.s. i have a fairbanks morse 1 1/2hp dishpan flywheels (hit and miss with battery and coil) for sale if your interested.
 

BWegher

Registered
Age
63
Just keep looking at local shows. Talk to the owners. Find out if there is a club near you. Go to an auction listed in GEM. Look in the paper for local farm auctions. The more you know before you buy, the happier you will be in the long run. Fairbanks-Morse and IHC engines commonly found are usually throttle governed, you may prefer hit-miss governed, such as a Witte headless, Hercules/Economy that are reliable and easy to work on.
Start small, with a cart, very much simpler to move around.
 

Tom Gosciminski

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/18/2019
Hi Justin, if you don't mind the look of disc type flywheels you can get small Fuller and Johnson, or Fairbanks dishpan engines fairly cheap. A favorite of mine is the IHC -M throttle gov engines, they are well built, easy to find parts for, have spoke type flywheels, and run like a clock, good luck. Tom :)
 

sparkplug54

Registered
McCormick Deering "M" or a International LA. Fairbanks aren't all that high priced either-depending on what model they are I guess. "M's" around my parts are 400-500 dallor engines. DAn
 

John Cunningham

Registered
Age
62
Hi Justin
My first engine 37 years ago which I still run today is an International LB 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 hp engine. Unpainted and runable they can be found around $150 to $200. You can't go wrong with one of them. Steve Barr a member of this site has a wonderful web site where he has gone to a lot of auctions. He posts a picture of the engine and how much it went for. That is going to give you a great idea of what goes for what at least at auctions anyway.
Thank you Steve for what you do. -John. Good luck Justin.
 

Dick Graybill

Subscriber
Age
81
Last Subscription Date
07/26/2020
Justin My First Engine Was A 1 1/2 Jaeger, Since That I Bought A Economy 1 1/2 @ Public Sale For $450.00 And A 1 1/2 Jaeger 3 Hole Flywheels For 375.00 Also A Fairbanks Dishpan Hit And Miss With Tin Oiler And Original Battery Box For 350.00 Private That Were All Loose And Only Took A Little Work To Get Them Running. Remember The International La , Lbs, And Model Ms Are Throttle Governed. Lots Of Luck . Dick In Snowy Central Pa.
 

Tom Brach

Registered
Hi Justin,

While I am sure the area one lives in is everything to the cost of old engines, I would run an ad in one of the local 'pennywise' or 'for sale' papers that are now fairly common. There are still a lot of old engines out there. I was given a 2.5 hp (Stover built for Sears) Economy engine in running condition and purchased a complete 1930 4 hp double tagged Stover with a full base (all original but seized) for $300 this past summer. I think the advice to stick to a complete engine makes sense, and unless you have the time and expertise, try for something that is not cracked or damaged. Don't be in a panic, good things come to those who wait. And if you know anyone or have relatives in rural areas, ask for their help. Also try any old timers who were involved in mining, logging, farming or portable sawmills. You may be surprised at what turns up.

Tom Brach
South Slocan, British Columbia
 

Don C. Wiley

In Memory Of
Age
86
Last Subscription Date
03/08/2010
Justin;

I don't know if you have been to a gas engine and tractor show yet, but I think with all the help you have recieved here, you should take it to a show as soon as you have time to do that.

Be sure to give yourself a chance to look over several engines before you jump in and buy. A show is an excelent place to visit and talk to folks who are "hooked" on old iron and nearly all will be glad to give you advise on what you should have for your first engine, but you need to make that decision after looking at several different engines. You might not care a thing for a Domestic side shaft and prefer the simple "cheaper" engine any way. You've already heard some good advise here on Harry's, so take that to a show and look over a bunch of engines before you make up your mind on one.

At the top of the page you will find "shows", click on that and check out the shows and attend a couple of them. Unless you want to go "SOUTH" you might have to wait till April to find one near you. I just checked my 2004 Show Directory and there are several withing around a two hour drive from Atlanta: Cumming, Washington, Calhoun, Dalton, Rock Spring, Woodland (south) and Carrollton. These are all in Georgia and I haven't checked the surrounding states. I would think you could go to good "Ole" Google and type in the names of the towns and the local Chambers of Commerce or rourism groups will have most of the local events listed for you, if not contact them and I'm sure they will be glad to help.

I think you have been STRICKEN by the Ironrustaholoic syndrome and you will find a show a very good place to get some nice relief from it.

Welcome to Harry's and the "doctors" here can help with a salve to help with your syndrome.

Good luck in a GREAT Hobby.

"DELCO DON" :p ;) :) Southern Illinois :wave:
 

John Raney

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/15/2015
Justin, I think I would go to a few shows, and look around. Talk to some engine people, ask lots of questions, and watch some engines run. Then you can decide what features,and type of engine tickles you fancy. Have Fun!
 

Inverted

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
12/26/2019
I think if I was just getting started and not sure if I was going to like the hobby or not, it would be buy a engine that would hold its value. I would suggest buying a John Deere. For a fairly reasonable engine they hold the value the best, they run good and the parts are readly availble. Now I am not saying I care for them but they are a real good start if you can find a fairly good one for $500.00 to $700.00 (and the cheeper the better) you should be able to fix it up and sell if for a little profit. - Then if you find you enjoy the hobby you can start looking for Side Shaft engines or something that trips your triger. I myself like the real Ugly ones - the uglyer the better. - Ted
 

Ronald E. McClellan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Justin; When I go to a show , I spend more time looking at the engines that are hit & miss with open crank and spoked flywheels because they are just more fun to watch. Ron
 

oncewaslost1982

Registered
I am wanting to start out with a hit and miss engine. Not throttle governed. I like the off beat of a hit and miss and yes i agree, they are more fun to watch.
 

Bill Schaller

Registered
Get Neighborly with an old scrounger or farmer, and ask if you can work on one of his engines for free. That's what I did, and after I got it running, I offered to bring it back, but told him I would really rather buy it for a reasonable amount. He was a nice old guy, and he sold it to me for a good price, since he could tell I liked it, and took care of it. I still have it, and my dad starts it up a least once a week.
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
39
Weren't some of the Fairbanks Dishpans throttlers? I don't remember if it was the spark plug models or the ignitor models that were throttlers but you want to ask about things like that. Some brands had hit-and-miss and throttle-governed versions of the same engine. I personally think that an Economy/Herculese/Jaeger engine will be your best all-around value. Hit and miss, spoked flywheels, parts readily available, common as dirt, affordable, and generally available everywhere (not specific to some geographic area like dragsaws are in the northwest).
 

Mike Monnier

Hoarder
Age
43
Last Subscription Date
12/18/2019
Throttling dishpan Fairbanks will have a magneto, or at least a bracket for mounting a magneto. You can also tell by the extra rod running to the carburetor. They are typically painted green like their spoked flywheel brother.

Another fairly low cost hit and miss engine is the Stover CT series. They are an enclosed crank case engine, so you don't see all of the innards like you do on an open crank engine. Here again, you have to pay attention as they come in throttling and hit and miss versions. You can also find Nelson Brothers engines fairly reasonable. I would make sure to get a complete one as the parts don't seem to be as common as the engines. It's tough to beat the Hercules/Economy line for price and availability. I like them because they typically have noisy gears and make a good clack bumping the latch on the miss cycle. As many others have said, ask a lot of questions and visit a few shows. It also wouldn't hurt to have someone familiar with engines along with you when you finally decide to pull the trigger on buying that first engine.
 

sparkplug54

Registered
For a hit & miss then an economy/hercules would be the closest to your price range. Deere's are getting to be big money these days. DAn
 
Top