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Wiring Question

Reed Engine

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Asking for advice. My wife bought a “she shed” and wants some outlets and lights put in. Should I go with 12/2 with ground or is 14/2 big enough. We do plan on using a 110 window unit air conditioner.
 

Dwayne Fuller

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: Wiring question.

No 14/2. Use the 12/2 on all the circuits. Use 15amp breakers on the lights. 20 amp on the a/c. Anything needing a 30 amp breaker will need bigger wire.
 

posborne80

Registered
Both answers are correct, as far as they go, for the inside wiring. Depending on the distance from the circuit panel, voltage drop could be an issue requiring larger sized conductors for the supply. Local codes may require a disconnect and ground rod at the wiring entry to the structure. Get an electrician friend to look at this to be safe. Just a few thoughts as I read your question.......

Paul
 

Power

Registered
You have not said how long the run is, which, along with load determines wire size.
I would run 3 conductor of whatever size you need- ie 12/3 with ground. Does not cost much more, and you get 2 circuits. Perhaps put AC on one circuit, lights, coffee pot, etc on other. I would use GFI/AFCI breaker in house panel, and spend a bit extra for GFI outlets- just in case.. Helps keep wife around.:)
 

posborne80

Registered
Using a supply with three phase conductors and a ground kinda gives you two circuits. What you really have is two hot lines and one neutral. This configuration means that the neutral will carry the combined load of both circuits. Maybe not a problem here, just sayin'. The wisdom of placing GFCI receptacles downstream of GFCI/AFCI breakers is much discussed. Do a search on Mike Holme's forums for some interesting reading on this. Practically speaking, you probably could throw a hunk of Romex out the window and hook it up, no problem. Maybe the place where the shed came from has some plans or drawings for reference.
 

Power

Registered
Using a supply with three phase conductors and a ground kinda gives you two circuits. What you really have is two hot lines and one neutral. This configuration means that the neutral will carry the combined load of both circuits. Maybe not a problem here, just sayin'. The wisdom of placing GFCI receptacles downstream of GFCI/AFCI breakers is much discussed. Do a search on Mike Holme's forums for some interesting reading on this. Practically speaking, you probably could throw a hunk of Romex out the window and hook it up, no problem. Maybe the place where the shed came from has some plans or drawings for reference.
WOW- you are WAY off.

1. Normal residential circuits are single phase.
2. This is a well accepted wiring method referenced in NEC.
3. Wired this way, neutral only carries unbalance current. Greatest load on neutral is when 1 conductor is loaded to rated capacity and other conductor has no load. As load on other conductor increases, neutral current decreases.
 

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
WOW- you are WAY off.

1. Normal residential circuits are single phase.
2. This is a well accepted wiring method referenced in NEC.
3. Wired this way, neutral only carries unbalance current. Greatest load on neutral is when 1 conductor is loaded to rated capacity and other conductor has no load. As load on other conductor increases, neutral current decreases.
This is all true. Go with the two hots and a neutral.
 

posborne80

Registered
Power and Frank, you are both correct. I am completely wrong about figuring the load on those single phase circuits. There should be little chance of a problem if the lines are taken from both sides of the panel. My apologies to you two, Reed and all the readers here for my mistake.

Paul
 
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