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Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

gootsch

Registered
I have not had any bear stew since my father gave up the game tagging station 32 years ago. We ate a lot of bear meat over the years, my mother was very good at cooking it. It tasted a lot like very good beef when she presented it to the table.

Keep up the good work Terry, we are all enjoying the adventure.

Cleave West in Errol, NH had 3 Lombards at one time that hauled logs into his sawmill. I was never able to find out any more than that about them. Maybe Mr. Eames would know if his father ever mentioned it to him over the years. Another excuse to venture into Northern New Hampshire.
 

tharper

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We have a fondness for bear meat in our house as well!
My wife insists that its better than venison.

Cleave West. Yes, one of his former Lombards is in the museum in Ashland. It was recovered from the Leboeuf mill back in the 1960's. I believe they ran three of the former West machines.

Don Johnson recreated one a couple of years ago. Cleave had swapped out
the Wisconsin engines for IHC diesels. Do took a spare chassis he had
and did the same. I cannot remember the model engine but its exactly the same as Cleave used. It starts on gas then switches over to diesel.

Attached is a photo of the beast under construction

Her is a video of Don's Wisconsin powered Lombard and the Cleave West Special. The Wisconsin wasn't feeling well so it didn't want to cooperate:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE2KWTGUOig&t=88s

Best regards,

Terry
 

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gootsch

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I have been wundering about the Cleave West machines for about 40 years, nice to know that they were not scrapped during WWII or rotting in a swamp out behind Errol village. Thank you. The IH engines look like TD 16 engines or power units and parts are still available for them unlike the Wisconsons.

---------- Post added at 10:02:06 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:49:32 AM ----------

Oh, Ashland, which state, Maine or New Hampshire ?

Where was the Le Boeuf mill located ?
 

tharper

Registered
That would be Ashland, Maine - way up north snuggled up against the big woods.
LeBoeuf Mill (or I should say remains of...) is about 25 miles in on the American Realty Road from Ashland. Not much there today... just a big pile of sawdust.

Attached is a photo of the surviving Cleave's machine in Ashland. This
one was never converted to diesel. It still has its original 6 cylinder Wisconsin D4 (5-3/4"x6-1/2"). If you know where to find one of those!....

On October 6th & 7th we will be running both our 19 ton steam Lombard and
a 1932 10 gasoline Lombard at the Maine Forest & Logging History Museum
in Bradley, Maine as part of our "Living History" event.
 

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tharper

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Saturday October 6th the princess and I left the homestead at 4:00am to drive down to the Maine Forest & Logging Museum "Living History Day's" event. She worked hard helping the crew prep. the steam Lombard and served as my extra set of eyes while operating the 10 ton gasoline Lombard.

While we were there Brian and his son Tim, who operate the museum's Grady Machine Shop, worked on the Pharo Governor for my Wisconsin. A few
weeks ago Don had given me another "pot" to replace the original which
was badly smashed. Since the replacement pot was rusted-up it took a bit
to get apart and cleaned-up. The drive shaft was too far gone so I had to
use the shaft from my smashed governor.

Brian and Tim chucked the pot up in the lathe and faced the thrust bearing and the flange that mates with the top section. They also straightened the shaft since it had a bit of a bend.

Brian working in the shop


Here are the finished parts ready for final prep and painting.



Video of the shop:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyzI497E5Cs&t=4s

Best regards,

Terry
 

tharper

Registered
Finally! The patterns and core boxes are done for the infamous "impossible" part. AKA Part No. A27A (Lower Water Manifold Rear Fitting).

It fought me to the very end... impossible geometry, lost 3D scan file and wrong format, countless 3D printing re-do's, and re-painting the last piece at least 3 times. In addition because of the curved part line I could not use dowels for alignment pins since they would have been at different angles and made it impossible to attached and remove the pattern from the follower or the other pattern half. I ended up using round head rivets which allow for enough variance in the direction of pull to make it all work.

There is a part line around the neck of the pattern between the flange piece and the neck. When the mold is formed this will need to be "slicked" or smoother out so the finished casting won't have a ring around the neck. On the original casting you could just make out faint traces of it. I had to have the flange separate so it would be in aligned in such a way that it could be formed without undercuts in the mold.





Of all the castings I have had to fabricate patterns for - intake manifold, upper water manifold, oil pump drive gear case, front and middle lower water manifold fittings, etc. etc... this one has by FAR been the most challenging and difficult. The other two fittings are easy compared to this!

When I left school Friday the follower for the front fitting was printing. I already have the pattern pieces printed and only need to print the core boxes. So.... shortly we will have the front fitting done as well!

Best regards,

Terry
 

tharper

Registered
Another part ready to go! It wasn't too long ago I was convinced
that fixing the Pharo governor was going to be all but impossible
with the smashed pot and all.

Now, thanks to Don and Brian, I have a complete working governor ready to
be installed when the time comes.

Here it is along with the bronze housing for the angle drive. (thank goodness I didn't have to fabricate that! I still have to "tap out" a new
gasket and restore and attach the name plate but that's all easy
fiddly stuff.


I tried restoring the paint on the original tag but there was simply not enough relief left to get it to come out right. This is a typical problem with
trying to restore original etched plates - any bent or damaged area can make it very difficult to restore. You can see in the photo below how the lack of
relief makes it hard to get the colors to be crisp and sharply defined.So I will simply have to etch a new
plate. (been there.... done that!)



I love it when yet another daunting task is done! Now back to getting those
patterns for the front lower water fitting done!

Best regards,

Terry
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
Terry:

T'were it mine, I'd use the plate as shown in the bottom photo. I'd bet that most of them didn't look any better coming from the factory.
 

tharper

Registered
I know Elden, I know but..... I have the ability to make it better so...

Its that type A++++ personality thing!

Best regards,

Terry
 

jeff10049

Registered
Really cool seeing another update thank you for posting all of this coming along nicely. :)

Re the pharo tag I get the A+++ personality I are one:D but try not to over-restore the engine that tag has character and many years of history behind it. Also, it's the correct original.

I have no doubt you can make a better-looking tag but it won't be the "better" tag so to speak. The surviving parts and associated wear, nicks, dings of that engine tell a story try to retain as much as you can.

I'm not saying don't make it nice just don't over do it or some history will be lost. That surviving original tag has far more historical value than anything you can recreate and belongs on that governer if you ask me.... I know you didn't ask me but I thought I'd speak up as I'm sure many feel the same way I do.

That said, you can do whatever you want it'll still be great and I still can't wait for another update I'll just be sad to see that tag go in a drawer on not on the engine.:(
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
Terry I haven't spoken to you in quite a while on here. Thank you for the update. Those patterns you made are unbelievable! If I were to try to learn a computer program for this kind of thing which one would you recommend and how many months of playing around with that before I could actually do anything?
Incidentally I finally made it to New England this Autumn to pick up a piece of equipment and I got to see the Maine coast at Portland and lots of great color peaking in Vermont and New Hampshire.
I fell in love with the place!
 

tharper

Registered
Hello Kevin,

I apologize for not seeing your message earlier! Maine is a wonderful place but right now way up here near the border I am sick of winter already!

In regards to CAD. I use Autodesk Inventor Professional and have just transitioned to SolidWorks. Both are high end professional systems and are pricey to say the least. I have access through my work. Attached is a rendering of one of a set of Lombard log sleds we are working on. I modeled each component, then created the assembly and 2D drawings using Inventor Professional.

In regards to more affordable systems there is Sketchup which I have never used so I can't comment on its abilities. Autodesk offers Fusion 360 for home, hobby and startups. Its a good program. We use a version that has CAM capabilities so we can interface with our Tormach PCNC 440.

The interface with 3D printing is fairly easy - you just need the ability to export files from your CAD program in STL format into a slicer. We use Cura which is free and works well with our Creality CR10 3D printer - its the cheapest printer we have (less than $1,000.00 bucks) but it works very well and runs flawless!

As for leaning curve... I find the Autodesk products to be fairly intuitive. SolidWorks less so. There are a ton of how to videos on Youtube for just about everything! My students use them as their primary learning aid - those nice expensive text books just keep the desks weighted down.

I hope this helps! Currently I just need to aid the locating pins and another set of core boxes and patterns will be done!

Best regards,

Terry
 

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tharper

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[QUOTE...I have no doubt you can make a better-looking tag but it won't be the "better" tag so to speak. The surviving parts and associated wear, nicks, dings of that engine tell a story try to retain as much as you can.

I'm not saying don't make it nice just don't over do it or some history will be lost....
QUOTE]

Hello Jeff,

I understand an appreciate exactly what you are saying. I am on the fence if you will. I may just make a new tag just in case someone needs one some day.

You are correct. On one hand we have to fight the urge to "improve" (i.e. polish all that brass and aluminum to a mirror finish) or "preserve". While I am "restoring" the engine its only to replace missing components and bring it back to operating condition. The "preservation" part is trying to maintain the level factory finish (which may be high or low) and the lovely patina of a well cared for motor from 1925. If there are pits in the manifold castings of the original than the pits in my new castings are simply factory correct etc.

The crankcase is a good example - its a massive 500 lb manganese bronze casting. Would it polish up nice? Yup! but... a deep cleaning to remove 80 years of old oil and grime is all I have done.

The valve plugs... back in the day the valve needed to be ground on a regular basis. Those big bronze plugs are fairly beat-up... but they tell a story. Same with the oil pan. At some point the motor mounts let go at a bad time and the aluminum oil pan (holds 5 gallons of oil) crashed into the frame cross-member whacking a mighty hole in it. A blacksmith fabricated a crude patch using steel plate, angle iron and a bazillion screws. I am leaving it since it tells a story far better than I can. (and I don't want to risk messing-up a very unobtainable part!)

All good stuff!

Best regards,

Terry
 

tharper

Registered
Though we are in the depths of another never-ending northern Maine winter
progress is creeping forward.

The other day I finished the pattern and core boxes for the lower water manifold front fitting (Part No. A26A)

This I guess could be classified as the "Near" Impossible part. Though
it took a lot of adjusting here and there using measurements from an
original and matching 3D prints to a silicone mold we got it!

As with nearly all the patterns for the lower water manifold I had to
create a pattern consisting of 4 separate pieces plus a Follower to hold
everything in the correct position and two core boxes.

Attached is a photo of the complete set and of the original fitting.
So what next? On to the middle fitting! I already have the pattern pieces
printed and this week I will start the follower and core boxes.

On another note..... at the museum (the Maine Forest & Logging Museum)
we wanted to build a set of Lombard patent sleds to use during winter
living history events. These are heavy logging sleds that were hooked
into long trains of sleds and towed by either a steam Lombard log hauler
or the smaller 10 ton gasoline powered Lombards.

Years ago the Breton family donated a set of irons that we could use to
fabricate a complete "two-sled" rig from. Lombard offered two different sled
sizes - large for use with gasoline powered Lombards and VERY large for use
with the steamers. Our set is the smaller size. (each "Bob" ... and there are
two bobs per sled - weighs around 750 lbs.). The record for a gasoline Lombard
hauling sled such as these was set in 1935 and consisted of 22 sleds hauling
108 cords of pulpwood with a total weight of 298 tons.

With the iron in hand and the
museum supplying the lumber the Building Trades and Farm Mechanic's
students at the Presque Isle Regional Career & Technical Center have been
working to build the sleds. They are doing a fantastic job! They have just
about finished the first sled and are starting the second.
Eventually the museum will install log bunks which can be swapped-out for a body
we can carry passengers on.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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tharper

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Last night we had one of those wonderful northern Maine nights when the temp dropped to -20 degrees. Why did I move back here? LOL)

Anyway, the other day I finished 3D printing the last of the lower water
manifold patterns. Its hard to believe that I have created THE last pattern
I will need on this project and now have the ability to cast all the remaining
missing bits and pieces. Once I get it all finished-up and painted I am thinking of gathering all the patterns together for a group photo just
as a reference for how much work has been spent on patterns.

The other day I received one of those wonderful packages in the mail
that can super heat even a polar bear paradise. Opening it I found
four wonderful, amazing original primer cups as supplied by Wisconsin
back in the day and are correct for my motor.

They came via a collector restoring a 1917 FWD truck which used a Wisconsin T-head and were surplus to his needs. They will need some
TLC and some fabrication of missing bits but it sure beats having to
fabricate a complete set of six!

Originally these had either bakelite or wood handles. Now I just need
to find or fabricate two more! Thanks Bob!

Best regards,

Terry
 

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tharper

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If someone had told back in 2008 that I would still be working on this
project 11 years later I would have told them they were nuts. But... here we are.

Today marks a very, very major milestone... I have finished the very last pattern.
There are no more to be made. They are done. Now its just getting them to the foundry
to be cast and spending many enjoyable hours transforming rough casting into gleaming
bronze fittings that are nearly (as humanly possible) identical to the long vanished originals.

Its kind of a sweet but bitter moment. Sweet in that what was once declared an impossible
job is now done. The satisfaction that I fabricated these all myself starting with the most basic
of skills. The knowledge that I started out using a lath and hand tools and ended using
modern 3D modeling and printing. Bitter, in that the job is now done! However, that's
tempered by the fact that I have been able to use the skills and knowledge I acquired
to help others. For example patterns for the valve shrouds for a 1918 FWD truck, parts
for a 1910 Mitchell automobile and tomorrow, starting the patterns for a bronze sediment
bowl for another collector.

I would like to add that I greatly appreciate all the support and encouragement I have received
over the past years from each and everyone of you. I am also deeply thankful for the friendships
that this project has forged. Some of you I have had the honor to meet in person others only through
these pages and via e-mails and phone calls.The project to this point has indeed been a community effort.

So... here are the last of the patterns and core boxes. These are all for the lower water manifold
including what became known as the "impossible part". Also included
is the one original fitting that survived the decades.
 

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tharper

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More bling!!

After having the castings sitting around for what seems like forever, today I decided to mock-up the intake manifold to get the pipe lengths etc. Next step is polishing-up the pipes and solder it all together!

That little bit of brass has been an adventure. The patterns were some of the first I had ever made. They weren't perfect but they worked wonderful. I was initially worried since the stud locations on the blocks were all over the place - I think they offered-up the intake and match drilled! Anyway, I bored the holes with a bit of extra wiggle room and it all lined-up nicely.

Its an interesting design since its all built-up at a time when most manifolds were cast as one piece. Originally Wisconsin did offer a one piece manifold but at some point, by the time my motor was built, they had switched to this built-up style. Why would be anyone's guess.

Anyway What I chose to do was make a exact copy of the original and..... there we have it!
 

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tharper

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Yesterday marked a major milestone in this long, long but fun project. The intake manifold is DONE!

From the start of the project I knew replicating the intake manifold would be one of the most challenging parts of the project and was in fact one of the first items I focused on. My thought being if I could successfully tackle this than everything else would be fairly easy.

It has also set the criteria for the entire project. Whether for better or for worse I would work to replicate the original parts as accurately as possible even though the chances of someone knowing the difference would be remote at best and that a much simpler solution would probably function just as well.

So... here we are with a new intake manifold (part No. A34A) that is about as close to the original as possible. Next step is to polish it up and move on to the lower water manifold!

The bright spots are from cleaning up excess solder. I have included a photo of the OEM manifold on Don's engine for reference.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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