• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When registering, please provide your CITY and STATE as your location!

Wright Bros stationary engine

PaulGray

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/24/2019
Saw this neat book describing the evolution of the Wright bros aero engines put out by the Smithsonian. In the appendix is a reference to a stationary engine they made for their shop employing a neat mechanism to actuate the exhaust valve without a half-speed cam. It is a hot tube, air cooled design.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38739/38739-h/38739-h.htm#page65
I also never knew they used ported exhaust in one of their early aero engines to reduce the head cooling load... These guys were very ingenious !
 

Attachments

Mike Monnier

Hoarder
Age
43
Last Subscription Date
12/18/2019
Very cool! Does anyone know if this engine is on display or locked away in the archives of the Ford museum? I would be very interested in seeing more pictures of it to get a better understanding of how it operated compared to other engines of the era.
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
When I visited the Ford Museum in the late 1960's, the engine was in place in the Wright Brothers shop in Greenfield Village.

If the shop is still there, the engine will most likely still be there, too.
 

NAR

Subscriber
Age
40
Last Subscription Date
01/09/2019
These are pics of the engine I have on file from somewhere off the web. There's also a sketch someone drew of the gearless mechanism. What was the reason for the piston guide? on front of the head. Kind of a neat-looking engine.

-Nick
 

Attachments

PaulGray

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/24/2019
Neat pics Nick! I did not realize the piston had a crosshead. That is a very unsusal feature.
 

Mike Monnier

Hoarder
Age
43
Last Subscription Date
12/18/2019
I'm bummed that I missed it when I was at Greenfield Village. Then again the Wright Brothers shop is pretty packed with stuff.
 

PaulGray

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/24/2019
I was messing about in the shop this morning and had to try to replicate the mechanism in this engine. Here it is mocked up in wood... Eventually it will show up in iron on some contraption.
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=M7H-wnHxxXU
I believe centrifugal force will keep the outermost flipper arm put until it is moved by the pivot roller. Very clever fellows those Wright bros were....
 

Elden DuRand

In Memory Of
Age
78
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2017
Aww, Paul! Your mock-up of that gearless cam's got me thinking I have to have one of those on my next project.

As soon as I think I've run out of ideas, someone goes and gives me another one. :)
 

PaulGray

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/24/2019
Elden- there is a trick to doing the layout of the inner race. It dawned on me today how to do it. Basically you have to work from the pivot point of the flipper to one side of the layout then invert it to do the other side about the center line of the pivot point/rotation center line.
 

JohnAW

Registered
I know this is an old post, but I was very interested after reading. The Gearless design is so simple, yet ingenious. I think I will work a little on that design for another Quincy compressor I picked up to build into an engine. What did bother me about the situation is the fact that when I typed Taylors name into Google, football players seem to be much more important in today society. Thanks for bringing Charles Taylor to my attention, I for one appreciate his ingenuity and accomplishment. At my age I can only apologize for not knowing the story before and think it should be added to the history books along with the wright brothers.
 

JoeCB

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/28/2019
Yes, very interesting indeed, not only the mechanism but especially the Taylor story (thanks Owen) ... Working with Ford and "vanishing into another airplane plant" at the start of WWII, I wonder if Mr. Taylor was at the Willow Run, MI Bomber Plant that Ford built.

Joe B
 
Top