• If you like what you see here and your interests are compatible with our 30,000 other users, Welcome. Fill out the registration form with your interests, your real name (seen only by moderators) and your city, state or country. Your account is then manually checked and approved. There is too much funny business on the web for us to do otherwise. Be sure to use a working email address and do not use cloaking or anonymous web connections.

You Just Don’t See These

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Looks like Fastenal that “refuses” to ship to CA is shipping to Visalia, CA. I will have to be much more diligent in researching shippers. Fastenal is less than $200 from Washington State and I’m sure YRC would be closer to $500.
YRC is great at sending a “supplemental” bill, too. Maybe Fastenal won’t do that.
Live and learn!
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Old blacksmith book came. Looks like there’s lots of cool stuff I can make if I gain the skills.
You can make Steam Locomotive parts!
Shows dimensions for a cool crane to hold up heavy items in the power hammer. Lots to look at.
 

Attachments

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Fastenal is supposedly bringing my lineshaft stuff to Visalia. I don’t know if it’s a day or a week or a month. This shipping larger items stuff is so stressful.
 

Jeff Blaney

Subscriber
Age
32
Last Subscription Date
01/25/2020
Great find. I'm in southern Ontario and I stumble upon line shaft pulleys regularly at auctions, but I never, ever see the hangers????
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Exactly! Yes! Sheesh, they were mostly all thrown away years ago. Miserable to find and expensive when you do
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
For example...A local “historic” auto repair shop has its original lineshafts, machines, motor, belts, etc. Little Giant hammer, a pedestal grinder maybe a drill press. They are asking $10k turned down $2k.
If you break it down, the shafts you can buy new. The antique camel back drill presses are cheap around here. The pedestal grinders maybe a couple of hundred dollars. The belts all would have to replaced. The pulleys are $25-$100 ea. Therefore, the value left is in those hangers and that hammer.
But, $10k???
There is some value in the history of it. The locals talk about being in town when the hammer was working you could here it far and wide.
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Actually wooden pulleys were much used "in the day" simply because of the favorable coefficient of friction between leather and wood.

MOST common for the line shaft to be set up with either split or solid wood pulleys, the countershafts overhead with iron driven pulleys and the cone pulley in stepped wood to drive the iron stepped machine pulley below. The theory behind this is that the "downstream" driven pulley is the one which will show slippage first, the wooden driving pulleys remain "solid."

Seasoned operators could then "see" and possibly detect slippage earlier on the machine pulley right next to them and start steps to tighten - as in gotta keep production up!

Dodge Manufacturing Company (Not related to Dodge Motors) was a turn of the century producer of wooden pulleys and overhead shafting and hangers. Their catalogs can still be found and include all manner of shafting, hangers, couplings, tight & loose pulleys, and the ubiquitous wooden pulleys they were known for.



Joe K
 

Jeff Blaney

Subscriber
Age
32
Last Subscription Date
01/25/2020
I cleared out a bunch of step pulleys, small pulleys, one large pulley (approximately 36" in diameter) and a "Tight-Loose" clutch pulley assembly from my neighbour who was clearing out his place prior to moving. I'll try and get some pictures of the clutch assembly just for a reference.... I am guessing it was made locally, probably Hamilton, Ontario, a long time steel mill town and industrial centre.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
In the same vein of “you just don’t see these” a locally famous 80 or 90 year old one-family-owned Au͏t͏o repair shop is closing doors, forever. This shop had a foundry, engine rebuilding facility, ability to fabricate parts, soldering and welding section, small engine, agricultural, outboard engine and motorcycle repair. They cast their own speed parts, Billy Vukovich II tuned his engines there. What a historic place!
Just by a stroke of luck I got included in the clean out at the last minute completely by accident. I was able to purchase a few signs and a couple of old parts merchandisers. A really good day.
The best things I got were two pieces of old shop furniture including the standing writing desk shown and a ancient 6’ wooden tool rack with slanted shelves. Each old box opened provided a glimpse of automotive repair history. I was able to take home the big ancient Snap-On king pin and Ford spring perch removal tool. A very old and fancy slide hammer wooden box with lots of attachments. A very early selection of big and heavy seal installers, a very early selection of input shafts for clutch alignment and some wooden ones turned on a lathe. A Kent-Moore torque converter service tool set for early Mopar fluid drive!
I also took home lots of crazy looking early valve spring compressors. I intend on making racks to display most of the above tools.
I also found a Carter carburetor master tool kit.
I’m going back for round two, tomorrow.
 

Attachments

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
It was like being able to walk into one of the early shop pictures I post on here. As it gets cleaned out the original bottom layers of 1920s stuff begins to be unearthed. There’s still an original in-ground I beam car hoist to be saved, an ancient wall-mounted Allen battery charger, antique bolt racks, original wooden work benches, Pennzoil oil boy, 1970s Sun full size oscilloscope with all the instruments, racks and fixtures of all kind.
 

Attachments

cornbinder89

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
05/11/2020
Looks like a brick "hot table. I don't know how you find and get access to stuff you do. My guess is there are some places similar around here that I could drive by and no nothing about what is inside.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
These folks are the victims of family members getting older and maybe younger ones not on board with carrying on.
My eyes pop out of my head on this stuff.
“hot table” sure sounds like an apt description, CB. Gas was piped in through those hard lines. Old, old, old.
I got included because my nosy self asked why my smog customer was pulling a trailer. Well, he’s helping out friends and family...lol...oh! Where? What? Can I come?
I’ve never heard of this place and it’s under my nose.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Much of this stuff was stuck under my nose by the owner. I hadn’t seen it!
The Sioux seat grinder wouldn’t work on modern hardened seats, probably. I’d give it a try on old stuff.
The big Snap-On king pin set is one of those wish list things that is always out of reach.
The Carter carb (?) master repair tool set is wonderful if incomplete.
 

Attachments

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
The wheel balance is early, and those big, old rusty clamps came off the “hot table”.
 
Top