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You Just Don’t See These

Bear67

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/02/2020
I don't know what or how much, but the sales flyer for the John Negley auction in Grand Rapids, Ohio has lineshaft equipment listed. Auction info at whalenauction.com

John was a member here, he died in July I think, and the auction had a thread in the auction section of the stak. He has engines, tractors farm collectables, tools, parts and more
 

jos

Registered
I have quite a collection of pulleys, hangers and bearings but it often is hard to come up with the size one needs for a specific project. Several times I made something up from plywood, rough cut with the band saw, glued together and turned to size on the lathe. To fix them to the shafting a steel hub with a keyway can be screwed to one or both sides. The stepped pulley in the picture I made that way.
Jos

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Bob in Mi.

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/04/2020
Imagine my shock when I found my paid for lineshaft lot relisted on EBay! I contacted seller, no response. I contacted EBay and it appears to be a glitch. Seller finally contacted me...
Talk about making me nervous!
The item hasn’t shipped. Seller is set on using Fastenal even though Fastenal doesn’t ship to CA. That’s their official position.
Always something!

That is not entirely true, more often in the winter they will. In the summer time the trucks are full, winter not as much. I use the a lot for shipping the fenders that we make. There is a man here in Michigan that has line shaft parts, Dave Shell, has Davey Salvage, and is on Ebay. Here in Michigan we have two tractor clubs that have huge line shaft displays, Buckley and Oakley Tractor Clubs.

When trying to ship with fastenal, contact Amanda Archer on the Fastenal 3pl quote website, she takes care of us very well.

Bob.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Davey Salvage has sold me lots of things. Yes! He is the guy!
I will now request Fastenal on every bigger item even though we had to hand load at the Visalia, CA warehouse because their forklift was not feeling well.
 

jos

Registered
Got this pulley today. It's going to be used with the fast and loose set driving my planer. I find the extra wide pulleys, for use opposite the fast & loose pair, the hardest to find. This one is about 13 1/2" wide and 18" diam. It has a lot of wear probably due to slipping belts so I"ll skim the surface in the lathe.
The center hole is way to big for the shaft, 70 mm vs. 55mm but I have had good results spacing with rubber sheet of appropriate thickness.
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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Nice enough to be furniture.
I have to agree with you on finding wide pulleys. Not common?
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
The center holes of "Dodge" Pulleys (and probably other makes as well) were made "oversize" in some common size.

Dodge would provide wooden "thimbles" which were maple wood bushing half circles which could be bought in the standard external diameter, and any internal diameter necessary to fit the shaft.

Shafting "in the day" was frequently made to the nearest "fraction" under a standard size. Thus 1-1/2 stock would be turned down to 1-7/16" diameter and 2" shaft stock would be turned down to 1-15/16" finished size. Dodge could make the wood thimble hole to any desired size but the standard "under-fractional" sizes (which co-incidentally fit the Dodge provided shafting) were available off the shelf.

In my shop here (19th century tools only) I have as "ephemera" a 12x5 Dodge split wooden pulley - looking much as the picture further up. The hole on this is 3"

In front of my house (built in 1982) for ephemera I have a sheet metal pressed steel split pulley which is 22x4-1/2. The bushing/thimble on this one is metal and seems also 3" in diameter - with a 1-11/16 hole in it. I imagine based on the pressed steel flanged pulley construction, a wooden thimble might get "compressed" or cut from the sharp metal edges - hence a metal thimble.

So I imagine for common line shaft pulleys, 3" bushings were common.

But - whatever works would be a standard of excellence in those days.

Joe K
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Joe K, would you post pictures of your shop? Thanks for the explanation of the weird shaft sizes.
Did Dodge make the pulleys?
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Joe K, would you post pictures of your shop? Thanks for the explanation of the weird shaft sizes.
Did Dodge make the pulleys?
Currently the machines are in place but largely inoperable. Until I sold it I had a 1907 Flather 16x8' lathe which was driven through a "Drive-All" and a 1.5hp reversing electric motor. (I should have kept it until something else was in operation.)

Current tools waiting for installation of the line shafts include:

Shepard, Lathe & Co. 14x6.5 engine lathe (ca. 1864)
No-name but considered "D. Chamberlain Boston" planer 4' bed 20" between uprights. (Ca. 1860.)
Pratt & Whitney 6" shaper (ca. 1874)
Flather lathe Serial No. 1 (ca 1873) 20"x8'
Brown & Sharpe Universal Milling Machine 1862 pattern but mine Serial 1255 and from about 1880. The machines didn't change much.
Ames Chicopee Toolmaker's Lathe 7" x 42" bed. Ca. 1855 but made in this pattern into the 1870s.
Washburn Shops "sensitive drill" circa 1912 after a pattern from the 1890s by William Barr. Another "excelsior" sensitive drill IDENTICAL to the Washburn drill. AND a William Barr drill like 102 percent of the size of the others but missing pulleys. (It was used with a hung electric motor.)
Pratt & Whitney No. 3 20" drill. 6-1/2 ft tall.
Another Lathe & Morse Maker lathe identical to the SL&Co. but dated 1866. This is a work in progress.

Well, all are, really.

All of the above I have line-shafting (Dodge main shafts & hangers) and individual countershafts in suitable period sizes and patterns.

Retirement comes for me a year from this July. Slowly I'm transitioning and getting more of the pulleys & ephemera together.

Also I have a WF & J Barnes No. 5 velocipede lathe (which I use) and another 4-1/2 size both full velocipede. Keeps me in shape!

Guess you could say I've been doing this for a while now.

The 1866 Lathe & Morse was bought off of Craigslist last year. Seen, offered, and ended up being $100. The seller knew it was early and wanted it "saved."

There are too many early tools and not enough custodians. The tools are still out there...

Joe K
 

jos

Registered
That's a great collection of machinery Joe. What are your plans for the driving power?
19th century machinery is really scarce overhere. Guess Holland had a late start industrializing.

Shafting overhere is mostly metric, in round numbers, going up in 5 mm steps, pulleys are usually bored to shaft size but I do come across plenty of spacers or thimbles, as I just learnt they are called. Some shop made, some factory made. I can't recall ever having seen a Dodge make pulley overhere.
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I have some of the split, steel pulleys you mentioned, not sure if they are European made or American, they use cast iron 2pcs. thimbles. This one has a 21/2"center hole. It's driving my drill press.
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This one has a 41/4"center hole.
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Some of the cast hub, steel spoked and rim types coveniently got there size cast in.
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This is the largest I have up til now, 2 meter or over 6.5 ft diameter. Maybe something really big comes along to use it on.
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The pulley I got last week is already installed, driving the coutershaft of the planer. The other side of the countershaft has a pulley with a sprag or one way clutch in it that's belted to a slip ring E-motor, so when driving through the main shaft that pulley doesn't turn. When the countershaft's fast/loose set has it's belt on the loose pulley the machine can be driven by the E-motor. That way a job can be done on the machine without starting up and running the main drive engine.
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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
I find it an extreme coincidence that my local friend would have TWO old Seneca Falls small lathes in his shop at the same time. One of the lathes was supplied as pedal powered and the other not. One came from Tulare CA and the other Monterrey CA. I am not familiar with Pacific Tool and Supply of San Francisco. Pretty plate, though.
 

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